Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1837 - October 26 2012

14:57 Fernando Luiz de Souza 0 Comments






Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1837 with a release
date of October 26 2012 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a Q-S-T.  New Zealand hams will have to
wait a while longer to gain full access to 6 meters;
Germany's national ham radio society says no to a new pan-
European B-P-L standard; thethe Hurricane Watch Net
activates for hurricane Sandy; G-R-E quits the scanner
business and a well known British soprano will be the next
space tourist to visit the International Space Station.
Find out who on Amateur Radio NewslineT report number 1837
coming your way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RESTRUCTURING:  CLOSURE OF TV CHANNEL 1 AND ZL ACCESS TO 6
METERS UPDATE


Changes will be coming to the 6 meter band down-under, but
not as quickly as some hams in New Zealand had hoped for.
Amateur Radio Newsline's Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF, reports:

--

Amateurs across New Zealand may have to wait a bit longer to
get full access to the 6 meter band.  As previously
reported, 50 to 51 MHz down-under is to be returned to
amateur radio once all Channel 1 television has ceased using
the spectrum and the current management right for this band
expires.

What may not be known by some hams is that the last New
Zealand channel 1 television transmitter is not due to close
down until November 2013.  After that, the management right
under which it operates does not expire until August 2015.

Because of this, the New Zealand national amateur radio
society,  NZART, is working with the nations Radio Spectrum
Management on arrangements for the period between when all
the Channel 1 transmitters are turned off and their
management right expires. In the meantime any New Zealand
amateur in an area where TV channel 1 is no longer operating
can apply for a permit to operate on the band.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF,
down-under in Nelson, New Zealand

--

As we go to air, not exact date when all New Zealand hams
will have 6 meter access is known.  (NZART)

**

RADIO LAW:  DARC TO OPPOSE NEWLY PROPOSED EUROPEAN PLT
STANDARD

Germany's national amateur radio society, the Deutscher
Amateur Radio Club, or DARC will be asking the Deutsche
Commission for Electrical, Electronic & Information
Technologies to oppose a new pan-European draft Power Line
Transmission standard.  PLT is what Europe call Broadband
over Powerline or BPL.

During its October 22nd meeting, the DARC Board discussed
the pros and cons of the proposed draft standard.  While it
said that it recognizes the new draft provided for some non-
binding commitments for notching out of certain frequencies
in the amateur bands, it also noted that it fears the future
ambitions of the manufacturers of other PLC products in the
direction of higher limits for the emission of harmful
electromagnetic or EMC interference. This could lead to a
weakening of the previous limits in other European EMC
standards.

To be clear, this new standard concerns the devices that
people install in their homes to run data over their house
wiring.  It has nothing to do with PLC or BPL that is
carried over the over company power networks.  (Southgate,
DJ0QN)

**

RADIO LAW:  SARL TAKES UP ZONING REGULATIONS WITH THE CITY
OF CAPE TOWN

Its not just hams in the United States that are having
problems erecting towers and keeping them up.  And a case in
South Africa points graphically this out.  Amateur Radio
Newsline's Norm Seeley, KI7UP, is here with the details:

--

Recently South African Radio League President, Rassie
Erasmus, ZS1YT and Legal advisor. Johan Marais, ZS1JM, met
with a delegation of the Cape Town Metro Council.  This,  to
intervene in a notice received by a society member stating
that he requires approval in terms of the Environmental Act
& City of Cape Town Zoning regulations for his antenna which
is less than 15 meters in height.

It was quickly learned that the council had received a
complaint from a neighbor, which was most probably RF
related.  Rather than investigate the matter the Council
simply elected to notify the ham that his antenna has not
been approved and that it intend taking steps to either have
him remove the tower or to apply for the necessary permits.

But the South African Radio League delegation was right on
top of this one.  It pointed out that amateur radio antennas
fewer than 15 meters of are exempt under the provisions of
the National Environmental Management Act of 1998.

Based on this it was agreed that the process will be
suspended pending the Council consulting with its legal
advisors. The South African Radio League will then be
afforded further opportunities to discuss the issues once
feedback has been received from the Council's legal
department.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline. I'm Norm Seeley, KI7UP, in
Scottsdale, Arizona.

--

The South African Radio League will be keeping the qorld of
amateur radio up0dated on this one.  (SARL)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  HURRICANE WATCH NET ACTIVATED FOR HURRICANE
SANDY

The United States-based Hurricane Watch Net has been
activated for Hurricane Sandy.  Net operations began at
11:00 UTC on Wednesday, October 24th on 14.325 MHz to
observe and report conditions surrounding the storm to the
National Hurricane Center.

Sandy is expected to develop into what forecasters are
calling a volatile hurricane as tropical storm Sandy merges
with a powerful cold front charging towards the East Coast
late the weekend of October 27th and 28th.  As Sandy
progresses the Hurricane Watch Net will be looking for
condition reports from stations located in the affected
areas.  Hams in the places affected by this storm should be
prepared to operate from a place of safety.

Net organizers say that they appreciate the consideration of
all amateur operators in keeping the frequency of 14.325 MHz
clear, and listening for possible relays.  Operation on
lower frequencies such as 40 or 80 meters will be considered
depending on propagation during evening and night hours.

For information on the storm and the Hurricane Watch Net, go
to www.hwn.org on the World Wide Web.  (HWN)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  UK ESSEX COUNTY RAYNET CALLED OUT IN FLOOD
WATCH

Ham radio is called out in the UK as rising waters along
riverbanks put several towns on emergency alert.

The Radio Society of Great Britain reports that at 18:00 UTC
on Sunday, October 14th, the Emergency Planning Officer from
the Maldon District Council requested Essex RAYNET to be
placed on standby.  This in response to flood alerts issued
by the Environment Agency.

At 20.00 members were mobilized and deployed to the
riverbanks at Heybridge Basin, Fulbridge and the Hythe in
Maldon.  This was in preparation for the high tide and
possible tidal surge due at quarter to one in the morning.

Thankfully, the high tide hit without any significant
incident.  RAYNET volunteers were able to stand down shortly
afterward.  More information is on the Web at
www.essexraynet.co.uk.  (GB2RS)

**

HAM RADIO NEAR SPACE:  PICO HAM BALLOON MAKES TREK FROM UK
TO SWEDEN

PicoAtlas VII, a single foil balloon launched by James
Coxon, M6JCX, on Saturday, October 20th from Suffolk in the
UK has landed some 1050 kilometers or 650 miles to the East
in Sweden.

PicoAtlas VII carried a GPS receiver and a miniature
transmitter running only 10 milliwatts output sending RTTY
on 434.301 MHz USB.  The telemetry data from the balloon
transmitter could be decoded using the free software at dl-
fldigi. This program can decode many different amateur radio
digital modes and can be downloaded for Windows, Mac and
Ubuntu Linux at tinyurl.com/8zlo437.

An increasing number of radio amateurs are experimenting
with ultra light balloon payloads, typically weighing less
than 100 grams.  Balloons such as these do not go to high
altitudes.   Instead they float between 3,500 and 6,000
meters which roughly equates to 9000 to 20,000 feet for an
extended period of time.  During the 19 hour flight this
balloon successfully crossed the North Sea before landing in
central Sweden.  We will have more ham radio space related
news later on in this weeks report.  (Southgate)

**

HAM RADIO NEAR SPACE:  MAY LAUNCH AND OCTOBER RECOVERY OF
HIGH ALTITUDE BALLOON PAYLOAD

An amateur radio balloon project launched last May finally
ended this month with the recovery of the payload.

Members of AMSAT-LU, had launched a high altitude balloon on
19th May from La Pampa, Argentina.  The payload included a
70cm to 2m 4 watt FM repeater, live SSTV, an HF beacon and
two video cameras.  During the 4 hour flight, over 200
stations made contacts through the repeater.

Unfortunately, while the flight was deemed to be a complete
success the balloon came down in an isolated and flooded
area.  It was finally recovered from the mud on October 6th
by a 4 by 4 off-road adventure group.

The good news is that all flight data was retrieved.  This
included over 6 hours of video from the two cameras.
Details can be found at www.uk.amsat.org.  (GB2RS

**

BREAK 1

From the United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio
Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the W1JLI Memorial repeater serving Walpole,
Massachusetts.

(5 sec pause here)


**

RADIO BUSINESS:  GRE QUITS THE SCANNER BUSINESS BUR ALINCO
NOT AFFECTED

GRE, the radio manufacturer which also represents Alinco
here in the United States, has ceased all manufacture of
scanner radios.  The good news is that Alinco product sales
and service will continue.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Mark
Abramowicz, NT3V, has the details:

--

The news was a bit of a shock to the GRE group in Belmont,
California - word from Japan earlier this month that the GRE
personnel in Asia and the United States were being dismissed
and scanner operations were being discontinued.

It was October 16th when the official word was released by
GRE-employed U.S. managers of the shutdown in Japan.

But there was a pledge to keep the California office open
because of its distribution affiliation with Alinco.

Michael Herbert, WB6JKV, a service technician and engineer
for GRE's Belmont office, officially confirmed for Amateur
Radio Newsline that things are still go for Alinco.

"GRE America will continue to market, service and support
Alinco's radio products without any interruption," Herbert
says. "So, for us amateurs, it will be business as usual."

And, Herbert continues: "No worries for warranty repairs. We
have a great parts supply. We have a direct line with the
factory and they are really eager to go forward with us and
proceed."

Herbert says he's not authorized to say much more.

However, he says GRE is waiting on Alinco's new SDR, 100
watt HF radio due for delivery by Christmas.  And, is
expecting to distribute the new 900 megahertz /220 megahertz
mobile radio about Dayton time next May.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mark Abramowicz, NT3V,
in Philadelphia.

--

The bottom line.  If you own or are planning to purchase an
Alinco brand piece of radio gear you have nothing to worry
about.  However at airtime the future of GRE manufactured
scanner radios is unknown.  (ARNewslineT)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  ISABELLA COUNTY MICHIGAN WANTS RADIO AMATEURS

An Emergency Management Director in Michigan, is seeking the
assistance of the local ham radio community.  This to be
ready to provide solid emergency communications assistance
in time of crisis.

Isabella County's Marc Griffis is actively recruiting
licensed ham radio operators to help out in a variety of
situations including training exercises.  According to
Griffis, there are more than fifty ham radio operators in
Isabella County and he wants those who are interested to
attend a Community Emergency Response Team training meeting.

Griffis says there is a potential in Isabella County for
emergency management to call upon those with expertise in
ham radio operation, and he wants them to be prepared for
any situation.  Examples of the types of assistance Griffis
is referring to include assisting in the coordination of
search and rescue perimeters.  Also, communications between
shelters and in other situations where other forms of
communication have failed.

Isabella County is a located in central Michigan. As of
the 2000 census, the population was 63,351. Its county
seat is Mt. Pleasant.  (Michigan Morning Sun)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  UNLICENSED IOWA BROADCASTER ISSUED $10000 NAL

It's rare that you hear of an unlicensed broadcaster in
Iowa, but it apparently has happened.  This with word that
the FCC has issued a $10,000 Notice of Apparent Liability
for Forfeiture to Thomas Costa for allegedly operating an
unlicensed radio transmitter on the frequency 87.9 MHz in
Iowa City.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Bruce Tennant, K6PZW,
reports:

--

This past September 17th agents from the Enforcement
Bureau's Kansas City Office used direction finding to locate
the source of radio frequency transmissions on the frequency
87.9 MHz to a transmitting antenna mounted on a chimney of a
residence in Iowa City.  The agents determined that the
signal exceeded the limits for operation under Part 15 of
the Commission's rules and therefore required a license.
The Commission's records showed that no authorization was
issued to anyone for operation of an FM broadcast station at
or near this address.

On September 18th agents from the Kansas City Office again
used direction finding and confirmed that the station was
still in operation.   The agents, this time accompanied by
the property owner, inspected the unlicensed station's
antenna and transmitter.  The latter was located in a locked
basement room.  It turned out that the station was automated
with a computer providing audio to a non-certified FM
transmitter.  The property owner stated that one Thomas
Costa rented the basement room housing the station.

Later that day, the agents interviewed Costa.  At that time
he admitted that he rented the basement room and installed
the radio station equipment but denied operating it.  Rather
he claimed that several unnamed individuals owned the
equipment and gave him rent money each month which he, in
turn, gave to the property owner.  Costa also asserted that
the alleged operators of the station did not provide him
with their names or contact information in order to protect
him and them from the FCC.  He also stated that he was told
by the unnamed operators that he could expect the Commission
to inspect the station at some point and order him to cease
operation.

Now in issuing the $10,000 N-A-L the FCC says that the
record evidence in this case is sufficient to establish that
Costa violated Section 301 of the Communications Act.  Also
that Costa can be said to have "operated" the unlicensed
radio station because the evidence shows that he exercised
control over the general conduct or management of it despite
his claim that other individuals, who he refused to
identify, were actually the operators.  In this regard,
Costa admitted that he rented and paid the monthly rental
for the locked room housing the unlicensed station, and that
he installed the station equipment.

Further, during the interview with the FCC agents, Costa
mentioned that he was warned about the unlawfulness of the
operation by unnamed individuals, who told him that he could
expect the Commission to inspect the station and order him
to cease operations at some point.  Assuming the statement
to be true, it appears that, in spite of the warning, Costa
nonetheless allowed the station to continue to operate in
the basement room.  The FCC says that these facts indicate
that Costa consciously operated and/or otherwise was
involved in the general conduct or management of the
unauthorized station.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, in
Los Angeles.

--

Costa was given the customary 30 days to pay the proposed
fine or to file an appeal.  (FCC)

**

RADIO LAW:  BBG ACCUSES SYRIA OF JAMMING SATELLITE SIGNALS
(Print version only)

The United States Broadcasting Board of Governors and
several other international broadcasters believe jamming of
their satellite signals last week came from Syria.

According to an announcement from the board, the
interference has disrupted satellite transmissions in Europe
and the Middle East.  Specifically, the jamming hit
satellites operated by Eutelsat, a European satellite
operator, and affecting TV and radio programs reaching
millions of households.

The board noted that the jamming started when Eutelsat
announced it would terminate transmission of 19 channels
belonging to Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting.  Several
international broadcasters also criticized the jamming,
citing disruption of broadcasts from Russia through Europe,
Central Asia and the Middle East.  Here in the United
States, the Broadcasting Board of Governors said signals of
Voice of America, Radio Free Europe and the Middle East
Broadcasting Networks were affected.

According to the Broadcasting Board of Governors, an earlier
round of jamming this month was traced directly to Iran.
(RW)

**

RADIO ON THE WEB:  SOUTHGATE NEWS OPENS AMATEUR RADIO TODAY
DISCUSSION BOARD

Great Britain's Southgate Amateur Radio News has launched a
new amateur radio forum discussion board.  Called the Ham
Radio Today the forum contains lots of amateur radio news
stories, plus sections for special interest groups.  While
geared mainly toward Europe and IARU Region 1, the board
offers subjects of interest to hams world-wide including
specialty areas to discuss 5 MHz operation, ham radio
satellites EME operations and reports from several of the
worlds best known propagation experts.  Registration is free
and only takes a minute.  You'll find the new forum board
at www.hamradiotoday.com  (Southgate)

**

RADIO EDUCATION:  ARRL GRANT RETURNS HAM RADIO TO MISSOURI
SCHOOL

Thanks to a dedicated teacher and a grant from the American
Radio Relay League, ham radio is back at a suburban Saint
Louis, Missouri school.

STL Today reports that a new amateur radio club has been
created at St. Charles High School, in St. Charles County.
The club was started by science teacher Ellen Zerr,
KD0PES, after the ARRL recently awarded nearly $2,000 to the
school.  Zerr used the grant to buy radio gear and antennas
for the station.

The last time the school had an active amateur radio club
was way back in the 1960's.  You can read the full story
at tinyurl.com/new-missouri-club  (STL Today)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  ANOKA COUNTY ARC CELEBRATES THE HALLOWEEN
CAPITOL OF THE WORLD  (Print Version Only)

Turning to the social scene, since 1920 the City of Anoka,
Minnesota, has hosted some major Halloween festivities,
earning the reputation of "The Halloween Capitol of the
World".  To commemorate this years festivities the Anoka
County Radio Club will operate a special event station W0YFZ
from Anoka High School parking lot on Saturday, October 27th
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time.  Visitors are welcome to
come observe the special event Haloween station.  More about
this operation is on the web at tinyurl.com/anoka-halloween-
event  (KB1UOG)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  14 YEAR OLD MAKES DIGITAL DXCC

The ARRL report that 14 year old radio amateur Tom Jose,
VU3TMO, has just achieved his Digital DXCC award.

First licensed when he was 13 years old in December of 2011,
VU3TMO is a 3rd generation ham operator in his family along
with his parents.  VU3TMO is a member of India's National
Institute of Amateur Radio and the Dayton Amateur Radio
Association.  He is reported to be one of the youngest hams
in his nation.  (ARRL, Southgate)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  ARRL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER
ALLEN PITTS, W1AGP, RETIRES

After more than eight years as the ARRL Media and Public
Relations Manager, Allen Pitts, W1AGP, has retired.

During his tenure, Pitts was responsible for developing
public relations campaigns that featured the many facets of
the Amateur Radio Service.  The first of these was the
simple but very effective Hello Radio campaign in 2006 that
highlighted the fun and friendships of ham radio.  That was
followed by Emergency Radio, which built on the ARRL and the
Amateur Radio Service's response during Hurricane Katrina.
Next was his We Do That - Radio in 2008 showcased the
technologies used in Amateur Radio.  Pitts rounded out his
career by spearheading the 2011 with the  Do It Yourself  or
DIY campaign aimed at recruiting members of the burgeoning
maker and hacker community to expand their horizons through
becoming amateur radio operators.

While W1AGP has retired from day to day work at ARRL
headquarters, he has not severed his ties with the national
society.  The ARRL is currently seeking a new Media and
Public Relations Manager.  In the interim, Pitts has agreed
to continue on a very limited part-time basis during the
selection process to find a successor.  He also hopes to be
able to work as a consultant on the League's Centennial
projects, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ARRL.
(ARRL)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  From the
United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
with links to the world from our only official website at
www.arnewsline.org and being relayed by the volunteer
services of the following radio amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

WORLDBEAT:  OPERATOR NEEDED FOR 2013 AMERICAN SAMOA
DXPEDITION

Are you interested in going to American Samoa on a
DXpedition?  If yes, listen up.

Bill Worthman, N6MW, and Jim Colletto, N6TQ. will be active
stroke KH8 from a hotel in Tutuila between March 19th and
the 28th of next year.  Their location on the island will be
well south of the Pago Pago harbor area to avoid as much
mountain low angle cut off as possible.

According to their website, they have an opening for one
more operator to go along on this operation.  For more
details and updates, visit n6mw.jimdo.com on the World Wide
Web.  (OPDX)

**

WORLDBEAT:  DARC SEEKS NOMINATIONS FOR ANNUAL HORKHEIMER
PRIZE

Nominations are being invited by the German national amateur
radio society, the DARC, for the prestigious Horkheimer
Prize.  The prize consists of an etched glass trophy and a
monetary prize for non-personal use. The money is to be
spent for the promotion of amateur radio however the
recipient chooses. The prize can be awarded to one or more
persons or institutions.

Any member of an amateur radio society in the International
Amateur Radio Union is eligible, and self proposals are
permitted.  Nominations must be submitted to DARC by March
28, 2013, and the prize itself will be awarded at the
opening of next year's Ham Radio convention in
Friedrichshafen.  More information in the German language is
on-line at www.darc.de  (DARC, GB2RS)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  FUNCUBE-2 A STEP CLOSER TO LAUNCH

The highly publicized Funcube satellite has taken another
step toward becoming a reality.  This with work that AMSAT-
UK has delivered a set of completed Funcube 2 subsystem
boards to Clyde Space Ltd in Glasgow.  The handover took
place on October 19th.  The boards represent the Funcube-
2 subsystem that will become a part of the UKube-1
spacecraft.

Three circuit boards make up the spacecraft.  One is for
command, control and telemetry.  An RF Board that houses the
command receiver, telemetry transmitter and linear
transponder and a third board contains the 400 milliwatt VHF
amplifier and sensors.

Funcube-2 will provide a 435 to 145 MHz linear transponder
for amateur radio SSB and CW communications and telemetry
for school students around the world.  Its host, the UKube-1
spacecraft is expected to be launched on a Soyuz-2 launcher
from the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch facility in Kazakhstan
in March 2013.  (AMSAT-UK)

**

RADIO FROM SPACE:  NEW EXOPLANET DISCOVERED ONLY 24 TRILLION
MILES AWAY

Scientists using visual and radio telescope data have
discovered the closest planet outside our Solar System.  One
that is orbiting a sun-like star about 24 trillion miles
away from Earth.

According to astronomers at the European Southern
Observatory the so-called exoplanet has about the same mass
as Earth but it circles its star much closer than Earth does
the sun,   The exoplanet which is described as a planet
outside our Solar System is outside the "habitable zone" for
possible life because of hot and rocky conditions
Temperatures on its surface could reach some 2,200 degrees
and the surface is likely to be lava.

Scientists discovered the planet while monitoring stars in
Alpha Centauri, a neighboring star system, only about four
light years away.  That system is peppered with stars
orbiting one another, making the hunt for planets difficult,
astronomers explained.

This is now the closest of more than 840 confirmed
exoplanets.  This according to research published in the
British science journal Nature.  (Nature)

**

DX

In DX, DF7NX is currently operational from Bolivia as CP8MW.
He is active on HF Bands mostly operating CW.  QSL as
directed on the air.

LU3XEM, LU3XEI, LU1XBF, LU5VAT and LU7DSY will be active
from Penguin Island November 2nd to the 4th  as LTZ0.  They
will be operational on 80 through 10 ethers using CW, SSB
and PSK 31.  QSL this operation via LU7DSY

DF7NX is currently operational from Bolivia as CP8MW.  He is
active on the High Frequency bands mostly using CW.  QSL via
his home call, either direct or via the bureau.

JR1MLT has been heard on the air from Singapore as 9V1KK.
He is reportedly active on all of the High Frequency bands
using various modes.  QSL direct only via JH1ILX.

N5ZO will be active from Ascension Island through October
30th  as ZD8O.  He plans to operate the CQ WW DX SSB Contest
in Single Operator All Band category.  If you make contact,
QSL via OH0XX

ND9M will be active from Diego Garcia Island through
November 4th under the callsign VQ92JC.  He also plans to
operate the CQ World Wide DX SSB Contest while at that
location.  If you work him please QSL via home call.

Lastly, ZS3Oh is currently on the air
from Botswana as A22LL.  He is reported to be active on HF
Bands mostly using CW.  QSL via home call.

(Above from various DX news sources)

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  BRITISH SOPRANO SARAH BRIGHTMAN TO BE THE
NEXT VISITOR TO THE ISS

The British songstress who created the role of Christine
Daae (pron "Die Aye") in Sir Andrew Lloyd Webbers musical
stage classic The Phantom of the Opera will be the next
space tourist to visit the International Space Station.
Amateur Radio Newsline's Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, has the
details:

--


On Wednesday, October 10th it was announced in Moscow that
world famous soprano Sarah Brightman had passed the required
mental and physical examinations to permit her fly to the
ISS.  And in a video of the press conference made public by
the Russian Space Agency Roscosmos, and the singer herself,
Brightman described how as a child she was inspired by the
Apollo 11 landing on the moon.

--

Brightman:  "When I look back, my minds eye brings me to a
rush of images from all of the incredible things that I have
been privileged to experience in my life.  But if I keep
tracking back, my thoughts eventually come to rest on a
flickering TV screen in 1969.  There as a small and
incredulous child I watched a man bound gently from the
steps of a rocket ship and land on the surface of the moon.

"This really was an adventure.  It was something miraculous.

"For me it was an epiphany.  From that moment I began
looking into the future.  I began to dream about what life
might hold in store for me and of what I could accomplish."

--

During her comments, Brightman said the trip would serve as
a way to promote environmental awareness and to encourage
women's education by helping to close the gender gap in the
sciences.  For this she has called on the United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, better
known as UNESCO, to join with her to make it happen:


--

Brightman:  "There are two key areas that we have identified
which unify my personal passions, UNESCO's objectives and my
spaceflight.  Both are inexplicably linked and both relate
to issues of sustainability."

--

After completing an upcoming world tour to promote her new
album appropriately called Dream Chaser, Brightman will
undertake six months of training at Star City in Moscow in
preparation for her mission to the International Space
Station.  Once on-orbit she is expected to take part in
several educational ventures as just mentioned but it is not
yet known if she will obtain an amateur radio license or has
any plans to make any ham radio contacts from the ISS.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
in the Newsroom in Los Angeles.

--

This is not Sarah Brightman's first venture into the area of
science education.  Earlier this year in conjunction with
Virgin Galactic she launched the Brightman STEM Scholarship
program.  STEM is an acronym for the words science,
technology, engineering, and mathematics.  Her program is
designed to help young women in the United States to pursue
STEM education across their four year college careers.

(Roscosmos, Southgate, others)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC
Communicator, CQ Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX
Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Roscosmos, Rain, the RSGB, the
Southgate News, TWiT-TV and Australia's WIA News, that's all
from the Amateur Radio NewslineT.  Our e-mail address is
newsline (at) arnewsline (dot) org.  More information is
available at Amateur Radio Newsline'sT only official website
located at www.arnewsline.org.  You can also write to us or
support us at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue,
Santa Clarita California, 91350

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Jeff Clark, K8JAC, saying 73 and we thank you for
listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline is Copyright 2012.  All rights
reserved.

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