Amateur Radio Newsline Report 1844 - December 14 2012

16:05 Fernando Luiz de Souza 0 Comments







Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1844 with a release
date of December 14, 2012 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.





The following is a Q-S-T.  A high altitude balloon carrying
an amateur radio APRS transponder flies from California to
Morocco; D-Star tests coming to the High Frequency bands;
two nations on opposite sides of the world gain access to
472 to 479 Kilohertz and more on the Department of Homeland
Security sponsored emergency communications traing at the
2013 Dayton Hamvention.  Find out the details are on Amateur
Radio NewslineT report number 1844 coming your way right
now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY APRS BALLOON LAUNCHED IN CALIFORNIA
LANDS IN MOROCCO

A group of high altitude balloon experimenters have achieved
a milestone.  This with confirmation that their K6RPT-
12 APRS equipped high altitude balloon has successfully
crossed the Atlantic and landed in Morocco.  Amateur Radio
Newsline's Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, has the details:

--

Amateur radio stations from the United Kingdom to the Azores
had been listening for the transatlantic balloon signing
K6RPT-12 on 144.390 MHz FM.  This after it was lofted
skyward from California at about 0126 UTC on Monday,
December 3rd.

The balloon was launched by the California Near Space
Project team with the intent of it crossing the Atlantic
heading for the British Isles.   When it left the USA it was
traveling at over 185 an hour but was believed to have
slowed down in its over-water trek to as little as 55 miles
an hour.  Knowing this, the payload was designed for over 60
hours of flight.  It also included a heating system for its
144.390 MHz FM transmitter developed by Johnathan Corgan,
AE6HO, to prevent it freezing during overnight flight.  This
was because the bitterly cold night temperatures at that
altitude have caused the transmitters on several amateur
radio balloons to fail.

After its journey across the Atlantic its APRS signals were
first picked up by stations in Spain.  It was last heard at
09:22:31 UTC on December 5th  descending rapidly, indicating
that the balloon had finally burst.  Its last recorded
position was 34�25.75' North and 3�58.96' West placing it in
the Taza Provence of Morocco North-North East of Tazekka
National Park.

It is believed there are less than 150 radio amateurs in
Morocco and no known APRS stations.  As such the balloon and
its payload may never be recovered.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, in
Los Angeles.

--

It should be noted that the amateur radio APRS frequency is
not standardized world-wide.  The United States uses 144.390
MHz while the British Isles and Europe use 144.800 MHz.  To
see the See the K6RPT-12 APRS reported flight track please
take your web browser to tinyurl.com/k6rpt-12 on the World-
Wide-Web.  (California Near Space Project, Southgate,
others)

**

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY: HF D-STAR TESTS TO BE HELD SATURDAY AND
SUNDAY UTC

D-Star is coming to a high frequency band near you.
According to a post on the Illinois D-Star Reflector, by
Kent Hufford, KQ4KK, D-Star High Frequency tests will be
held Saturday at midnight UTC and Sunday at 1500 hours UTC.
D-Star operation will last only 5 minutes on each band
beginning on 6 meters and working down to 10, 12, 15, 17,
20, 40 and finally 75 meters.   The test will be compatible
with Icom 9100 series transceivers and other D-Star equipped
High Frequency transceivers.  The posting did not mention
specific frequencies to be used but asked those interested
to monitor D-Star reflector 030C to coordinate.  (KQ4KK, D-
Star Reflector)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  NEW ZEALAND HAMS GET 472 to 479 KHZ LOW
FREQUENCY BAND

Hams in New Zealand are getting access to the 472 kHz to 479
kHz band.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Jim Neachen, ZL2BHF, has
more:

--

At the World Radiocommunication Conference held earlier this
year the band from 472 kHz to 479 kHz was allocated to the
Amateur service for use world wide on a secondary basis.
Some nations almost immediately opened it to use by their
ham radio communities and now it becomes our turn here, down
under.

Its now has been agreed that New Zealand amateurs will be
given access to this band following agreements made with the
Radio Spectrum Policy and Planning Group of the Ministry of
Business, Innovation & Employment.  And the rules they came
up with are quite simple.

Like the rest of the world, the frequency range will be 472
kHz to 479 kHz on a secondary, non interfering basis with
other spectrum users.  Power output will be 25 watts
effective radiated with no bandwidth restrictions.

As a result of this new allocation, New Zealand hams will
loose access to the previous temporary low frequency
allocation from 505 to 515 kHz.  However the Ministry has
agreed that the temporary use of the band by the nation's
ham radio community will be permitted for another 12 months
until the end of 2013.  This is to provide amateurs with the
opportunity to retune or rebuild their equipment to use the
new band.

All in all not a bad way to end 2012 and begin the new year.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF, in
Nelson, New Zealand.

--

The rules creating the 472 kHz to 479 kHz low frequency band
in New Zealand come are effective on December 20th.  (NZART)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  NEW SPECTRUM FOR UK HAMS AT 474 KHZ AND 5
MHZ

Meantime over in the United Kingdom, holders of a UK Full
class license will soon be able to apply for a Notice of
Variation to their ham tickets  This to use 472 to 479 KHz
as well as three additional 5 MHz channels that will permit
up to 6 kHz bandwidth emissions.

The new 472 to 479 KHz band is being created as a result of
the World Radiocommunications conference held earlier this
year.  The added spectrum in the 5 Experimental Band is the
outcome of negotiations between the spectrums primary user
and telecommunications regulator Ofcom.   The primary user
was unable to agree to contiguous spectrum, however it has
been agreed that three additional non-contiguous frequencies
will be available.

Notices of Variation will be accepted after January 1st of
2013.  Details on the application process will be published
shortly. (GB2RS)

**

RADIO POLITICS:  IARU ACCEPTS TWO NEW MEMBERS

The Federation of Radio Sport of Azerbaijan and the St
Vincent and the Grenadines Amateur Radio Club are the two
newest members of the International Amateur Radio Union.

The Radio Sport of Azerbaijan has some 50 members while the
Grenadines Amateur Radio Club hosts 21.  Both nations have
relatively small ham radio populations with the former
representing all 50 of its ham radio population and the
latter representing 21 of that nation's 134.

As of February, 2009, the International Amateur Radio Union
was  composed of 162 national member societies.  The
addition of The Radio Sport of Azerbaijan and the Grenadines
Amateur Radio Club now brings that total to 164. (IARU,
Southgate, others)

**

RADIO LAW:  CONFRONTATIONAL WORLD CONFERENCE ON
INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS BEING HELD DUBAI

A confrontational United Nations internet regulation treaty
being discussed at a gathering in Dubai may impact on
amateur radio operators.  This, according to the
telecommunications information website dot-nxt.  Amateur
Radio Newslines Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, explains:

--

At the heart of the issue is the term operating agencies.
Currently the international telecommunication regulations or
I-T-R's apply only to recognized operating agencies.  This
really means the large telecommunications operators in each
country such as ATT and Verizon here in the United States.

Some countries want that term changed to just the term
agencies.  This  would mean the I-T-R's would become
applicable to a vastly larger number of groups.  So rather
than just ATT, British Telecom or Italia Telecom and the
like, the international treaty would then apply to entities
such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft and eBay just to name a
few.  In reality, just about every Internet company, as well
private network operators, leased-line operators, government
agencies and even amateur radio operators would be included
in this new definition.

But this idea is not sitting well with many developed
nations.  Opposed so far are the United States, Canada,
Japan, Korea, Mexico, Poland and the pan-European C-E-P-T
and the Inter American Telecommunications Commission which
is better known by the acronym Citel.  On the other side in
favor of the change are the Arab States, African States,
Brazil, India, Philippines and several others.

In the meantime hthe entire conference risks grinding to a
halt until this issue can be decided.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
in the newsroom in Los Angeles.

--

You can find out more about the situation on-line at
tinyurl.com/wcit-meeting-2012  (Dot-Nxt,
NewsGateInternational)

**

BREAK 1

From the United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio
Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the W6GNS repeater serving Downey California.

(5 sec pause here)


**

ENFORCEMENT:  KANSAS HAM ISSUED $10000 NAL FOR ALLEGED
OPERATION OF FM BROSDCAST STATION

A ham in Kansas has been issued a $10,000 Notice of Apparent
Liability to Monetary Forfeiture for allegedly operating an
unlicensed FM broadcast station.  Amateur Radio Newsline's
Norm Seeley, KI7UP, has the details:

--

The proposed $10,000 fine was issued on December 5th to Glen
Rubash, licensee of Amateur Radio Station KC0GPV.  This for
what the FCC terms as his apparently willful and repeated
violating of Section 301 of the Communications Act.  This by
operating an unlicensed radio transmitter on the frequency
88.3 MHz in Manhattan, Kansas.

By way of background, this past September 26th agents from
the Enforcement Bureau's Kansas City Office T-hunted the
source of an 88.3 MHz signal to a transmitting antenna
mounted on a pole next to a residence in Manhattan, Kansas.
The agents determined that the signals from the antenna
exceeded the limits for operation under Part 15 of the
Commission's rules and therefore required a license.  The
Commission's records showed that no authorization was issued
to anyone for operation of an FM broadcast station at or
near this address.

On September 27th the agents from the Kansas City Office
again used direction-finding techniques to confirm if the
station was still operating on 88.3 MHz from the same
location, and found that it was.   The agents, accompanied
by the property owner, inspected the unlicensed station's
antenna and transmitter.  The latter was located in a locked
detached garage.  The property owner stated that he allowed
Rubash to use the garage to operate the station and that he
thought the operation was legal because Rubash told him that
he was a licensed radio operator.

Later that same day a person it identified as Glen Rubash
spoke to an agent from the Kansas City Office via telephone.
At that time the regulatory agency claims that Rubash
confirmed that he was an Extra class amateur licensee
assigned call sign KC0GPV.  He also admitted that he
purchased the radio transmitter and that the station had
been on the air for two months.  The person on the phone
reportedly added that he would not voluntarily relinquish
the transmitter if asked to do so.

Now the FCC has acted in the case by proposing the $10,000
fine.  It concludes, based on the evidence before it, that
Mr. Rubash apparently willfully and repeatedly violated
Section 301 of the Act by operating radio transmission
equipment without the required Commission authorization and
as such is liable for the proposed $10,000 fine.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, Im, Norm Seeley, KI7UP, in
Scottsdale, Arizona

--

As is customary, Rubash was given the customary 30 days to
pay the proposed fine or to file an appeal.  (FCC)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  UPDATED INFORMATION ON DHS EMERGENCY RESPONSE
CLASS AH HAMVENTION 2013

The Department of Homeland Security's Office of Emergency
Communications has announced that on January 14, 2013, it
will begin accepting registration requests for the training
class that it will be sponsoring next May at the 2013 Dayton
Hamvention.

Students requesting to attend must meet all pre-requisites
and provide electronic scanned images of certain documents
at the time of registration.  These include proof of
completion of FEMA emergency incident instructional sessions
IS-100.b, IS-200.b, IS-700.a and IS-800.b.  They must also
provide a copy of their General Class or above FCC amateur
radio license. The DHS says that it is important that all
listed documents be submitted at one time along with the
registration request in order to be considered.

The session is limited to 50 students and the registration
process will be closed when that number of qualified
students is reached.  But even if you are not among the 50
selected to attend the session there will be other training
available.  Word is that the instructors conducting the
course will also be giving a forum at Hamventionr 2013
regarding the use of trained amateur radio operators as
backup communicators in an emergency operations environment.

More information including the actual class and the e-mail
address for pre-registration will soon be posted on-line at
www.Hamvention.org.  (Press release)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  AUSTRALIA ACMA FINDS STOLEN EMERGENCY BEACON

Australian Search and Rescue was recently alerted that an
activated emergency position-indicating radio beacon, or
EPIRB had been stolen from the city of South Melbourne.
After narrowing down its initial search, Search and Rescue
called in the expertise of a field inspector from the
Australian Communications Authority or ACMA.  Using a Yagi
directional antenna, he eventually found the errant device
hanging from overhead power lines. It was safely retrieved
for evidence by members of the Victoria Police.  For those
not aware, EPIRB's are automatic or manually activated
search and rescue beacons linked to satellites when turned
on.  (VK3PC)

**

HAM HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS:  GETTING INTO THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
BY HAM RADIO

The Moose Jaw Canada Times Herald reports that kids in that
city had a chance to tell their holiday gift requests to
Santa up at the North Pole using amateur radio.  Brenda
MacKenzie, VE5TRG, and other members of the Moose Jaw
Amateur Radio Club operated the ham radio links.  You can
read the complete story on-line at tinyurl.com/moose-jaw-
holiday.
(Via e-mail)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  NAMES IN THE NEWS OKLAHOMA STUDENTS HOLD
RADIO TRIBUTE ON PEARL HARBOR DAY

Okalahoma's  Lawton Constitution newspaper reports that
students at the Eisenhower Middle School's amateur radio
club recently commemorated the 71st anniversary of Pearl
Harbor Day.  The club held the tribute to honor all
veterans, but especially the 2,402 Americans killed in the
December 7, 1941 Japanese sneak attack on the United States
base in Hawaii.

Clifton Harper, KE5YZB, is the teacher who sponsors the
amateur radio club.  He told the newspaper that students
started contacting other amateur radio operators around the
world at 8:30 a.m. and continued until 3:30 p.m. both local
time.  Three separate stations were in use  including one in
a trailer from the Lawton Amateur Radio Club operating as
W5KS.

According to the newspaper, about 140 students took part in
the event throughout the school day.  More is on-line at
tinyurl.com/lawton-pearl-harbor.  (Lawton Constitution)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  WYONG MINI CONTEST UNIVERSITY OPEN FOR
REGISTRATIONS

Registration to attend the free Mini Contest University at
Australia's Wyong field day in February 2013 is now open.
For details please visit tinyurl.com/contest-u-down-under on
the World Wide Web.  (VK2JI)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  HANDIHAM MANAGER'S TECHNOLOGY AWARD TO
KK4JZX.

Some names in the news.  Jose Tamayo, KK4JZX, has been named
to receive the 2012 Handiham Manager's Technology Award.
This for his dedication to the Handiham Remote Base software
update project.

According to the Handihams, Tamayo has done exemplary work
to debug and update the existing W4MQ remote base client
software.  He has lead the beta testing team and is working
to build accessibility into the newest version of this
important remote control client.  (WA0TDA)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  BRITISH SINGER SARAH BRIGHTMAN TO BLAST
OFF TO SPACE IN 2015

The Space Adventures Agency has confirmed that famed British
soprano Sarah Brightman has signed an agreement with the
Russian Space Agency and secured herself a space trip to the
International Space Station for sometime in in 2015.

As previously reported here on Amateur Radio Newsline, about
two months ago the singer was cleared to fly by the medical
commission and  set her schedule to begin gan her training
at Russia's Cosmonaut Training Centre outside Moscow.  More
recently Brightman told a Russian newspaper she will also
have to learn speak some Russian before her space trip to be
able to communicate with the crew.

Brightman's eventual arrival on-orbit will denote a long
period between visitors to the orbiting outpost.  The last
visitor was Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte who
traveled into space in 2009.  (G0SFJ, others)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  From the
United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
with links to the world from our only official website at
www.arnewsline.org and being relayed by the volunteer
services of the following radio amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

CHANGING OF THE GUARD:   CQ NEW PRODUCTS EDITOR JOHN WOOD,
SR., WV5J - SK

The changing of the guard in amateur radio continues with
the sad news that John Wood, Sr., WV5J, who served as CQ's
New Products Editor since 2009, passed away on December 3
after a brief battle with cancer.

A lifelong journalist, Wood spent most of his career as a
reporter and editor for newspapers in and around Memphis,
Tennessee.  He lived in the Memphis suburb of Germantown.

A contributor to CQ for several years on a variety of
topics, John became editor of the "What's New" column as of
the magazine's December, 2009, issue.  He continued writing
occasional feature articles as well.  His most recent,
"There's a 'Secret Service' in Memphis on the 222 Ham Band,"
appeared in the Fall 2012 issue of CQ VHF.

Wood is survived by his wife of 41 years, Marie, WA4WFX; his
son, John, Jr., KI4VCK; his daughter, Christi, and two
grandchildren.  The family requests that contributions in
John's memory be made to the St. Jude Children's Research
Hospital.  At the time of his passing John Wood, Sr., WV5J,
was only age 61.  (CQ)

**

CHANGING OF THE GUARD:  HELICOPTER NEWS PIONEER JOHN SILVA -
SK

The man who invented helicopter coverage for television, has
died.  John D. Silva was the chief engineer for Los Angeles
television station KTLA when he convinced station executives
to give him $40,000 to outfit a rented Bell helicopter with
a TV camera for news coverage.

Silva then worked in secrecy with Hollywood special effects
shops and engineers from the General Electric Corporation to
find or invent technology small and light enough to fit on a
helicopter.   He and his small team broadcast their first
air to ground signal on July 28, 1958 to Los Angeles viewers
who would eventually come to equate a helicopter news
coverage with a high-speed police pursuits and the like.

In an interview with Smithsonian Air & Space Magazine, Silva
said he came up with the idea while on the freeway.  He
explained that he was driving on the Hollywood Freeway one
morning and when the idea came to him.

Silva told Air & Space that he never thought about being a
pioneer.  Rather all that he ever wanted to do was get KTLA
News there and get the picture before the competition got
it.

The Los Angeles Times reported Silva died in Camarillo,
California, of Pneumonia complications. He was age 92.  (RW)

**

WORLDBEAT:  HISTORIC BLETCHLEY PARK GB2BP QRT

A historic amateur radio station is going QRT for good.
Over the weekend of December 15th and 16th, station GB2BP
will be making its final transmissions from the famed
Bletchley Park estate in the United Kingdom.

Bletchley Park has been the home of GB2BP as well as serving
as the location of its sponsor the Milton Keynes Amateur
Radio Society for the past 18 years.  But both are being
forced to vacate the estate due to a change in its status to
a museum.  This will mean that it will have scheduled
opening and closing times after which there will be no
public access.

For those who are not aware of Bletchley Park's
significance, during World War 2 it was the site of the
United Kingdom's main message intercept center where ciphers
and codes of several Axis countries were decrypted.  The
most important of these were the ciphers generated by the
German Enigma and Lorenz machines. The work done there is
generally credited as one of the main reasons that the
Allies won the war.
While GB2BP may no longer be in full time residence on the
Bletchley Park Estate it will re-appear occasionally as a
special event station supporting public events at the new
museum.  (Southgate)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  RUSSIAN HAM TO SPEND A YEAR IN SPACE:

Russian Cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, RN3BF, along with NASA
Astronaut Scott Kelly have been chosen for a one-year long
term assignment aboard the International Space Station.
According to NASA, the mission will which will begin in 2015
will include collecting scientific data that will be
important to the future of human exploration of our solar
system.  Also it should help researchers to understand
better how the human body reacts and adapts to the harsh
environment of space as NASA plans for missions around the
Moon, to an asteroid and ultimately to Mars.  (ARRL)

**

RADIO IN SPACE:  VOYAGER 1 REACHING INTERSTELLAR SPACE

Researchers say that NASA's long-lived Voyager 1 which is
heading out of the solar system, has reached what they call
the magnetic highway leading to interstellar space

Voyager 1 will be the first manmade object to leave the
solar system.  Scientists believe the probe is currently in
an area of deep space where the magnetic field lines from
the sun are intersecting with magnetic fields from
interstellar space.  They believe that this phenomenon is
causing highly energetic particles from distant supernova
explosions and other cosmic events to zoom inside the solar
system, while less-energetic solar particles exit.

The Voyager 1 probe was launched 35 years ago to study the
outer planets.  It is currently some 11 billion miles from
Earth.  At that distance, it takes radio signals traveling
at the speed of light 17 hours to reach Earth.

Voyager 2 which is traveling on a different path out of the
solar system has experienced similar, though more gradual
changes in its environment than Voyager 1.  Scientists do
not believe Voyager 2, which is about 9 billion miles from
Earth, has yet reached the magnetic highway to interstellar
space.  (Space Update)

**

ON THE AIR:  N4D CELEBRATES ARRL PUERTO RICO STATE
CONVENTION

On the air, the ARRL Puerto Rico State Convention
operate special event station N4D from  January 11th to the
25, 2013 to commemorate the first ever ARRL Convention to be
held there.  Frequency to listenout on are 14.250, 21.350
and 28.450 MHz on the High Frequency babds as wll as locally
on 147.550 MHz FM on 2 meters.  More information on the
convention and specialo event station N4D is on-line at
www.arrlpr.org or by e-mail to wavilesjr (at) yahoo (dot)
com.  (ARRL Puerto Rico State Convention)

**

DX

In DX, DD0VR and DE3BWR will be active from Vietnam through
January 4th as XV0VR.  During their stay they also plan to
operate from Cat Ba Island December 18th to the 20th and Phu
Quoc Island from December 30th through January 2nd.  QSL
these operations via DD0VR.

JA7LU will be active from Phu Quoc Island, Vietnam January
12th to the 16 as XV4LU.  He will be operational on 40
through 10 meters on  SSB  and RTTY.  QSL direct only via
home call,

KE4TG will be active as J38RF from Grenada between February
6th and March 8th. His primary interest is the Digital modes
but he may operate  some CW and SSB.  QSL via his home
callsign direct as listed at QRZ.com. His logs will be
uploaded to Logbook of the World.

Lastly, several sources are reporting that a team of 10
operators will be active from Robinson Crusoe Island during
mid-2013. It was also mentioned that this is the same group
who activated D64K earlier this year. Look for more details
to be forthcoming.

Above from various DX news sources,

**

SPACE AND THINGS:  A STRANGE USE FOR A CUBESAT
And finally this week, while hams and researchers look at
the now venerable cubesats as communications and scientific
research space platforms, a company in Scotland has come up
with its own idea.  How about space burials?  No, we are not
kidding as we hear from Amateur Radio Newsline's Cheryl
Lasek, K9BIK.

--

A Glasgow based company called Alba Space is planning to use
cubesats for just that.  Burials of human remains in space.

According to the FAQ on the Alba Space website, the company
will take a portion of ones cremated ash and integrate it
into its spacecraft called the AlbaCube.  It will then
launch it skyward using a commercial service provider who
takes it from Earth into space.

Why choose Space Burial over other forms of end off life
celebration?  Alba Space says that space is a place were
only very few and very fortunate people have had the chance
to venture.  The company says that it wants to help make
space become a place that is accessible to the public and
enable those who have an interest in it to fulfill their
life's ambition to do so.  It notes that after passing on
that 75% of people in the United Kingdom get cremated and
you have to do something with the ashes, so why not a ride
into space.

Will this be a burial option only for the rich and famous?
Not according to Alba Space.  It says that while it has not
yet launched its pricing options it is aiming for it to be
competitively priced with other funeral options.  This so
the average consumer can afford to take part.

And if you will excuse a pun or two, this could be another
fascinating use for the final frontier or the most extreme
of extreme DX.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Cheryl Lasek, K9BIK, in
Zion, Illinois.

--

Alba Space says that it's still not sure when its space
burial service might begin.  It says that it's currently at
its market research phase and are trying to gauge the demand
for different services such as sub-orbital, low earth orbit
and beyond.  More about Alba Space's plans is on line at
www.albaorbital.com.  (Southgate)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC
Communicator, CQ Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX
Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain, the RSGB, the Southgate
News, TWiT-TV and Australia's W-I-A News, that's all from
the Amateur Radio NewslineT.  Our e-mail address is
newsline(at)arnewsline(dot)org.  More information is
available at Amateur Radio Newsline'sT only official website
located at www.arnewsline.org.  You can also write to us or
support us at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue,
Santa Clarita California, 91350

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Jim Davis, W2JKD, in Vero Beach, Florida, saying 73 and
we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio NewslineT is Copyright 2012.  All rights
reserved.

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