Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1872 - June 28 2013

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Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1872 with a release
date of June 28 2013 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST.  Rules change sought to allow
encrypted ham radio communications in limited instances; the
Consumer Electronics Association is forming a standards
group to reduce distracted driving; 5 MHz privileges come to
Samoa; ARES responds to Alberta Canada flooding; FCC sets RF
exposure comment deadline and Amateur Radio Newsline
announces its 2013 Young Ham of the Year.  All this and more
on Amateur Radio NewslineT report number 1872 coming your
way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RADIO LAW:  RULES CHANGE SOUGHT TO PERMIT ENCRYPTION OF
SENSITIVE HAM RADIO EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

The FCC is inviting public comments on a proposal from a
Massachusetts ham to amend the Part 97 Amateur Service
rules.  This to permit the encryption of certain amateur
communications during emergency operations or related
training exercises.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Bruce Tennant,
K6PZW, has the details:

--

On June 7 the FCC accepted for filing a Petition for
Rulemaking from Don Rolph, AB1PH, designated as RM-11699 and
put it on public notice. In it Rolph suggests that an
additional exception to Part 97.113 be made to permit
encrypted communications when hams are participating in
emergency services operations or related training exercises
which may involve information covered by medical privacy
requirements or other sensitive data.  This could include
logistical information concerning medical supplies,
personnel movement or any other data designated by Federal
authorities managing relief or training efforts.

As you are likely aware, FCC rule 97.113 right now prohibits
hams from transmitting messages encoded for the purpose of
obscuring their meaning.  Rolph rule making petition says
that this restriction has impacted the relationship of
amateur radio volunteers and served agencies.  Also that it
has significantly limited the effectiveness of amateurs in
supporting emergency communications where secured
communications is required.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, in
Los Angeles.

--

In making his request Rolph notes that there already exists
precedent for this exemption.  He notes that Part 97 already
relaxes its encryption prohibitions with respect to
satellite control link communications and model craft radio
control.  The deadline for filing comments on RM-11699 is
July 8th.  (FCC, ARRL Letter)

**

FCC NEWS: FCC SETS RF EXPOSURE REASSESSMENT COMMENTS
DEADLINES

Ham radio operators and other interested parties have until
September 3rd to file comments on an FCC proceeding to
reassess the limits and policies governing exposure to radio
frequency electromagnetic fields. As previously reported,
the FCC released a First Report and Order, Further Notice of
Proposed Rulemaking and Notice of Inquiry in ET dockets 13-
84 and 03-137 on March 27.  They were published in the
Federal Register June 4 starting the clock on the commentary
period.

While the FCC proposals do not alter existing RF exposure
limits, they do call for the elimination of existing special
evaluation ham radio exemptions as outlined in Section
97.13(c) of the Commission's rules.
According to the ARRL Letter, the league plans to submit
comments this issue over summer.

The Commission will also accept reply comments filed after
September 3rd and continuing through November 1st.  Other
minor rules changes adopted in the Report and Order section
of the document take effect on August 5th.  (FCC, ARRL)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  ARES STANDS DOWN AFTER ALBERTA CANADA
FLOODING

Amateur Radio Emergency Service operations in the Canadian
province of Alberta stood down on Monday, May 24th.  This
after being called out several days earlier when severe
flooding hit that area.

According to a news release by Curtis Bidulock, VE6AEW, ARES
will remain on standby alert during the recovery process in
the event of a communication failure.  Also, a temporary
link put in place between the provincial linking system and
the VE6HAT repeater will remain in place until recovery
operations are complete.

During the height of the callout, VE2MBS reported that
emergency nets were operational on 7.135 and 3.675 MHz in
support of communications for the floods.  Unfortunately
both suffered some level of interference from Field Day
stations that were unaware of their operation.

Alberta Premier Alison Redford has promised that the
province will help flood victims put their lives back
together and provide financial aid to communities that need
to rebuild.   (VE6AEW, VE2MBS, RAC)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  CALIFORNIA CITY EMPHASIZES HAM RADIO
INVOLVEMENT IN TORNADO DRILL

Officials in the city of Roseville, California, are so aware
of the importance of amateur radio for emergency
communications that the ham community was invited to be a
part of a recent emergency preparedness drill.

According to news reports a dozen agencies gathered in
Placer County on Tuesday, June 11th for a mock tornado
drill.  The exercise emphasized skilled and reliable
communication and because of this the city brought in a
group of local hams from the Placer County Amateur Radio
Services to assist.

It was noted that amateur radio was a tool used during and
after the recent tornadoes in Oklahoma.  Roseville city
officials say an F-3 tornado hit the Sacramento Valley in
the last 50 years, so the potential for a large natural
disaster of that sort remains.  More is on-line at
tinyurl.com/roseville-tornado-drill.  (Published news
reports)

**

RADIO SAFETY:  CEA FORMING STANDARDS GROUP TO TACKLE
DISTRACTED DRIVING

The Consumer Electronics Association is forming a standards
group to reduce distracted driving that results from the use
of consumer electronic products in a mobile environment.

The Associations Portable, Handheld and In-Vehicle
Electronics Committee recently approved the formation of the
Driver Device Interface Working Group.  It will provide
recommendations on portable and handheld devices, as well as
other consumer electronics products used in private and
commercial vehicles, boats and aircraft.

Whether or not a representative of the amateur radio
community will be invited to serve on this committee or how
its findings might affect the future design of portable and
mobile ham radio gear are both unknown as we go to air.  You
can read more on line at tinyurl.com/distracted-driving-
committee  (RW)

**

RADIO LAW:  RESIDENT OPERATOR GRANTED 5 MHZ OPERATING
PRIVILEGES ON SAMOA

Atsuo Sakuma, 5W1SA, has become the first resident operator
on the island of Samoa to be issued special permission to
operate 5 MHz.   This as the Samoan Office of The Regulator
says that he can operate from 5.250 to 5.450 MHz.  Although
60 meter operating permits have been available to visitors
since 2011, these had generally been the 5 United States
allocated channels only.  (G4MWO)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  MOONBOUNCE FROM RWANDA THROUGH JULY 7

Several sources are reporting that DL2NUD and PE1L will be
involved in an Moonbounce operation from Rwanda through July
7th.  Their main interest will be for EME contacts on the
144, 432, 1296 and 2304 MHz bands.  The team also expects to
be on the High Frequency bands and 6 meters as well.  The
callsigns mentioned for this operation are 9X0EME, 9X0HP,
9X0L and 9X0MB. QSL all via PE1L. For more information and
updates keep an eye on www.emelogger.com/rwanda.  (Various)

**

BREAKING DX NEWS:  6 METER ONLY OPERATION FROM SOUTH KOREA

Some breaking news courtesy of the Ohio Penn DX newsletter.
Look for 17 operators to be active as 6M6M from South Korea
through July 31st.  As you might have guessed from their
callsign this will be a 6 meter only operation with four
high power stations using yagis and quad antennas.  Modes
mentioned include CW, SSB, FM, several digital and even good
old AM.  They will operate mainly from the Korean mainland,
but there is the possibility of a trip to several Islands on
the Air groups.  QSL this special operation via HL2UVH and
we will have more DX news later on in this weeks report.
(OPDX)

**

BREAK 1

From the United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio
Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the W3UU repeater serving Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania.

(5 sec pause here)


**

HAM HONORS:  ARNEWSLINE NAMES PADRAIG LYSANDROU, KC9UUS AS
2013 YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR

A sixteen year old Extra class amateur from Bloomington,
Indiana, has been selected as the 2013 Amateur Radio
Newsline Young Ham of the Year.  Mark Abramowicz, NT3V, is
here with the details:

--

"I'm not sure what to think. I'm happy."

And that's how it sounded when Padraig Lysandrou, KC9UUS,
heard the news he had been selected the Young Ham of the
Year.

He conceded he heard what he called rumors that he was being
nominated for something, but it didn't sink in until getting
the call from our Newsline headquarters that he might be
recognized for his achievements.

Lysandrou was born in Illinois, but has family in Cyprus.

He says his interest in ham radio was actually sparked by
his mom, Carolyn, KC9URR, who was a pretty serious shortwave
radio listener.

His father, is Plato. And, he has two sisters, Helena, who's
17, and Maria, 14.

"When I was little, I used to collect stamps," Lysandrou
recalls. "And, so my mom would show me all the letters and
all the stuff that she got back from shortwave stations -
all these intricate stamps.

"And, so I saw those and I wanted to get interested in
radio. I got into shortwave. And, then the interest grew
bigger and it wasn't just about stamps anymore. And, so, I
got interested in ham. I contacted Neil Rapp at my high
school and I joined the club."

Neil Rapp is WB9VPG, who teaches chemistry at Bloomington
High School South and met Padraig in class.

It was Rapp who invited him to join the school's amateur
radio club.

Rapp, co-nominated Padraig for the Amateur Radio Newsline
award along with Dr. Scott Wright, K0MD, who has taken part
in DX operations from Turks and Caicos, Chile, and China.

It was Rapp who introduced Lysandrou to a whole new world.
And, Lysandrou, who just turned 16, says it didn't take him
long to climb the license ladder.

"I got all three licenses within three months and then I
become president of my amateur radio club at school,"
Lysandrou says.

His Technician was earned in October 2011, General in
December 2011, and Extra in January 2012.

Lysandrou says participation in the School Club Round-up and
a program on the Peter Island DXpedition really sparked his
interest in DX.

"I decided to lead my own little expedition - DXpedition to
Cyprus," Lysandrou says. "I brought a Buddipole, which you
can change for the bands. But, I generally just use it on 20
meters.

"I brought a Yaseu FT-897, and some coax, step-down
transformer, batteries, the whole shebang. And, my mom and I
transmitted in Cyprus and then I decided it would be cool to
write an article for QST."

That was last summer and the article, 'A Crazy Idea, a
DXpedition to Cyprus,' was accepted and published as the QST
cover story in the past May's edition.

"I transmitted on two different mountain regions," Lysandrou
says. "I transmitted on a couple different beaches, I
transmitted in hotels, yes. I transmitted on the top of this
house by the beach that someone let us borrow.

"I transmitted really anywhere I could and I seemed to get
pretty good propogation."

So, what did Lynsandrou set out to do with this 5B
DXpedition? Contacts from the other side of the world and
fun!

"I got people from England all the way through Scandinavia,
to Russia, all the way down to Bulgaria and Dubai,"
Lysandrou recalls. "So, I tried to talk as much as possible
and meet new people. So, I took it slow, I didn't try to get
a million contacts."

He estimates it was slightly more than a hundred, actually,
and his mom was making some as well.

Word of his DXpedition spread before the article was
published and Lysandrou says he was invited to be a
presenter at the Dayton Hamvention Youth Forum this past May
run by Carole Perry WB2MGP.

"To meet other 16-year-olds who are Extras and who read my
article and are really excited to meet me is also really
cool," Lysandrou says. "I'm sort of a role model and I would
like to continue to be one."

Lysandrou was selected by Indiana Section Manager Lou
Everett, WA5LOU as an assistant section manager for youth.

His interests vary from 4-H to electronics, from music to
robotics.

And, yes, he's even played in Carnegie Hall.

But back home in Indiana...

"I've been designing circuits and messing around with a
bunch of high-voltage circuits and transformer drivers and
all sorts of stuff that fuel my interest between amateur
radio, electronics and chemistry," Lysandrou says.

It was an easy selection for the judges.

We here at Amateur Radio Newsline are proud to have Padraig
Lysandrou, KC9UUS, join our distinguished honor roll as the
2013 Young Ham of the Year.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mark Abramowicz, NT3V,
in Philadelphia.

--

Padraig Lysandrou, KC9UUS, will receive the Amateur Radio
Newsline Young Ham of the Year Award at a ceremony to be
held in his honor on Saturday, August 17th, at the
Huntsville Hamfest in Huntsville, Alabama.  The Young Ham of
the Year Award was created by the Amateur Radio Newsline
with corporate sponsorship from Yaesu USA, CQ Publishing and
Heil Sound.  (ARNewslineT)

**

RADIO ACCIDENTS:  KVTK AM LOOSES TOWER IN MOWING ACCIDENT

Listeners to KVTK-AM of Yankton, South Dakota, were recently
without the station for a few days.  This is because an
accident caused the stations broadcast tower to fall to the
ground.

The tower, which was 309 feet tall, was situated in the
middle of what was described as a small, grassy field
located about five miles west of the town of Vermillion.
Reportedly, a man cutting the grass Monday afternoon June
10th clipped one of the tower's guy-wires, causing it to
collapse shortly after 4 p.m. local time.

Engineers and other staffers of Five Star Communications,
which also owns KVHT-FM, reportedly worked quickly to find
the best way to begin broadcasting again after their tower
collapsed.  According to press reports the station was back
in operation from a temporary site on Friday, June 14th.

A small building located a short distance from the tower's
base was not damaged, as the collapsing metal snaked its way
around the structure without striking it.  Thankfully, no
one was injured in the mishap.  (RW, All Access Music)

**

RADIO BUSINESS:  SINCLAIR BUYS DIELECTRIC

Some good news for United States broadcaster's concerned
about service to their Dielectric brand broadcast towers and
antennas.  This with word that the Sinclair Broadcast
Group has announced the purchased of Dielectric from SPX
Corporation.

According to Sinclair President and CEO David Smith,
Dielectric has supplied more than two-thirds of the TV
industry's high power antennas and its name is synonymous
with expert engineering and quality products.  Smith added
that should a spectrum repack occurs; Dielectric will be
there to support that effort.

Gary Cavell is with the technical consulting firm Cavell
Mertz.  He says that the anticipated upcoming repack of
broadcast outlets in the face of spectrum reallocation to
broadband might prove to be impossible to accomplish in a
three year period without Dielectric.  (RW)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  G4HYG RELEASES NEW APRS MESSENGER
ANDROID APP

Chris Moulding, G4HYG, says that he has just released a
new APRS app for Android phones and tablets.  This so that
radio amateurs can send APRS position beacons and messages
from an Android equipped phone or tablet over a 3G or Wi-Fi
link to the APRS-IS internet system. It can also link by
Bluetooth to the new Bluetooth version of the APRS TNC Digi
Tracker.

G4HYG notes that there is a small charge for the app to help
pay for the development tool licensing fee.  More
information on the web at tinyurl.com/aprs-android-app.
(G4HYG)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  PATRICK STODDARD, WD9EWK, NAMED AMSAT'S
DIRECTOR OF FIELD OPERATIONS

Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK, has been named as AMSAT's new
Director of Field Operations.  In his new capacity, Stoddard
is responsible for managing AMSAT's corps of Area
Coordinators who represent AMSAT in their local areas.

For those not aware, Area Coordinators serve as the
"Ambassadors of AMSAT."  Their responsibilities include such
activities as manning an AMSAT booth at hamfests, giving
local or regional club presentations on AMSAT and satellite
operations.  They also serve as "Elmers" to those looking
for information about operating through satellites.  Area
Coordinators are also known to establish local nets and
assist with Field Day satellite activities. (ANS)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  From the
United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
with links to the world from our only official website at
www.arnewsline.org and being relayed by the volunteer
services of the following radio amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

THE CHANGING OF THE GUARD:  ARNEWSLINE ANCHOR DON CARLSON,
KQ6FM - S.K.

It is with deep sorrow that we report the passing of Amateur
Radio Newsline anchor and reporter Don Carlson, KQ6FM on
Friday morning, June 21st from complications to Pancreatic
Cancer.

A lifelong broadcaster by profession, during his career Don,
at times using the stage name Don Murray, worked at numerous
radio stations throughout California and Nevada.  His
favorite jobs were hosting oldies Rock and Roll or jazz
shows.

Don also owned a voice talent company called The Voice Shop.
From there he provided commercials and other announcements
for numerous radio and television stations across the United
States. This included several national spots about ham radio
that he produced for the ARRL.

In the world of ham radio Don's activities included ARRL
appointments in California, Nevada and at the national
level.  In Nevada he served as District Emergency
Coordinator for the North West District, Assistant Section
Emergency Coordinator, Section Emergency Coordinator, and
Public Information Coordinator.  His most recent position
was as Assistant Section Manager.

KQ6FM was also a member of the ARRL's National Public
Relations Committee.  There one of his greatest achievements
was helping to create the Public Information Officers Swiss
Army Knife guide and its associated training program.

Don's passion for ARES and Emergency Service in general led
him to become the voice of the annual EMCOMM West emergency
communications ham radio gathering.  Don not only emceed the
event when it was held in Reno but also supported the
convention by serving on the Board of Directors.  In
recognition to his many contributions to ham radio, in 2010
he was named as the ARRL Pacific Division "Ham of the Year"
with the award presented to him at that years Pacificon
convention.

Don Carlson, KQ6FM, is survived by his wife Judy and son
Andrew.  A Celebration of Life ceremony for Don was to be
held on Saturday, June 29th at Sierra Bible Church in Reno,
Nevada.  In lieu of flowers, Judy Carlson asks that
donations be made to a church or other charitable
institution of your choice to help someone less fortunate
than yourself.  (AF6PU, N7JEH, June Parsons)

**

RADIO RECORDS: CALIFORNIA HAMS CLAIM NEW 3.7 MM WORLD
DISTANCE RECORD

A pair of California hams are claiming a new world distance
record on the 77 to 81 GHz or 3.7 millimeter band.   The
asserted new record was set June 13th between Robert
Johnson, KF6KVG, and Goran Popovic, AD6IW.  The two achieved
a distance of 252.49 km with one operating from Mt Hamilton
in grid square CM97 and the other located at Kings Canyon
National Park located in grid DM06.  KF6KVG used a one foot
parabolic dish while the one used at AD6IW was twice the
size.  Both stations employed what are known as dielectric
resonator oscillator locked frequency control for extreme
stability.  (VHF Reflector)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  ILLW CONTINUES TO GROW

Jim Linton, VK3PC, tells Amateur Radio Newsline that
International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend continues to
grow.  In fact, it seems to have become the biggest and
arguably the world's first fun-filled event for portable
amateur radio stations that takes place in the month of
August.

According to VK3PC, the event continues to promote public
awareness of the old marine navigation and the need for
preservation and restoration of these facilities.  It also
promotes amateur radio and fosters international goodwill.

Now in its 16th year, International Lighthouse and Lightship
Weekend will be held August 17th and 18th.  So far some 285
registered sites representing more than 30 countries are on
board.  For more details please visit the website
www.illw.net  (VK3PC)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  DAYTON HAMVENTION ARISS UPDATE VIDEO
POSTED ON LINE

An update on amateur radio on the International Space
Station or ARISS program given by Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, at
the recent Dayton Hamvention  can now be viewed on the web.
In his presentation Bauer discusses a number of changes at
NASA that are affecting ARISS manned ham radio in space
program.  He also takes a look back at the past 30 years of
amateur radio on the Space Shuttle and now International
Space Station.  You will find the 23 minutes, 30 seconds
presentation on-line at tinyurl.com/ariss-dayton-update
(ARISS)

**

ON THE AIR:  POLISH CITY COMMEMORATIVE OPERATION HF50WLA

On the air, the city of Wladyslawowo Poland will be
celebrating its 50th anniversary this summer.  To
commemorate the event, local amateurs are celebrating using
the callsign HF50WLA until the 21st of July.  If you make
contact, please QSL via SP2YWL direct or electronically via
Logbook of the World.  (DXNS)

**

DX

In DX, word that HA1YA will be operational from Thassos
Island from July 5th to the 13th  as SW8EA.  He will be
active on the HF, VHF, UHF bands using CW and SSB.  If you
make contact, please QSL via his home call.

DL5YL and DL5YM, will be operating slash H-B-Zero from
Liechtenstein through early July.  No bands or operating
times have been mentioned.  QSL via their home callsigns.

RU0ZM will be in the village Kamenka in Asiatic Russia until
November operating stroke Zero.  He will be running 100
watts into a 2-element beam on 20 and 15 meters and a Windom
antenna for other bands.  QSL via UA0ZC, direct only.

OZ1DJJ will be on the air from Ammassalik Island from July
20th to August 1st operating as OX3LX.  He will be active on
High Frequency Bands plus 6 and 4 meters.  Modes to be used
were not announced.  QSL via OZ1PIF.

KK4OYJ will be operational as 9H3RJ from Gozo Island between
June 28th and August. No other details are available.  QSL
via his home callsign.

The 4M5DX Group is planning a DXpedition to Aves Island
sometime between November 1st, 2013 and February 28th, 2014.
The callsign mentioned is YW0A.  More information on this
one as its made available.

Lastly, members from the Spanish Aitana DX Group will be on
the air from the YN2N radio shack in Nicaragua between
October 1st to the 16th.   Operations will be on 160 through
6 meters using CW and SSB.   QSL via EB7DX, either direct or
by the bureau.

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  WILL WE SURVIVE IF A SUPER CME HITS THE
EARTH

And finally this week, a kind of rhetorical scientific
question.  Can our home planet survive a super Coronal Mass
Ejection from our home star if it was hurled directly at us.
While opinions among researchers are divided, at least some
in South Africa believe it would not be good news.  Amateur
Radio Newsline's Heather Embee, KB3TZD, takes a close look
at what these scientists believe might happen:

--

Our Sun is a yellow star that consists of a giant ball of
superheated plasma.  It's magnetic field oscillates and acts
as a dynamo that creates the sunspots, solar flares and
strong magnetic storms in the solar system. When a Coronal
Mass Ejection or C-M-E is spewed from corona of the Sun and
travels to the Earth the magnetic field of our planet
generally deflects it, and in the process creates auroras
around the magnetic poles.

But a report published by the South African Radio League
notes that some scientists claim that if a super C-M-E
should hit Earth then this level of a magnetic storm could
penetrate the planets magnetic field and cause devastation.
First of all the satellites on-orbit would be destroyed.
This would mean that all satellite telecommunications and
Direct Satellite T-V would go off the air.

On the ground, such a C-M-E could also generate extremely
high voltages in the power lines and destroy most if not all
of the transformers in the substations.  This would likely
cause complete blackouts in cities and towns.  Since water
pumps won't function, municipalities world-wide dependant on
pumped-in delivery might quickly dry up.

According to the report, scientists are currently keeping a
very close eye on the Sun with a dedicated satellite known
as the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.  At the same time
they are trying to develop some form of shielding that could
protect electrical transformers and other electronics during
such an event.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, KB3TZD,
in Berwick, Pennsylvania.

--

A massive solar storm that hit Earth in March of 1989 caused
blackouts in the entire province of Quebec, Canada.   That
power disruption also closed schools and businesses, kept
the Montreal Metro shut during the morning rush hour, and
closed Dorval Airport.  You can read more about it, courtesy
of NASA at tinyurl.com/giant-1989-cme.  (SARL)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC
Communicator, CQ Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX
Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain, the RSGB, the Southgate
News, TWiT-TV and Australia's W-I-A News, that's all from
the Amateur Radio NewslineT.  Our e-mail address is newsline
(at) arnewsline (dot) org.  More information is available at
Amateur Radio Newsline'sT only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org.  You can also write to us or support us
at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa
Clarita California, 91350

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Skeeter Nash, N5ASH, near Houston, Texas, saying 73 and
we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline is Copyright 2013.  All rights
reserved.

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