Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1874 - July 12 2013

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Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1874 with a release
date of July 12 2013 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a Q-S-T.  Ham radio continues its relief
efforts in India during monsoon season; hams in Canada and
Portugal may soon have added operating spectrum; the ARRL
says "no" to encrypted communications on the ham radio
bands; the FITSAT One ham radio satellite deorbits and the
story of some strange radio signals from space.  Find out
the details are on Amateur Radio NewslineT report number
1874 coming your way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RESCUE RADIO:  HAM RADIO MONSOON RELIEF EFFORTS CONTINUE IN
INDIA

The crisis caused by the devastating monsoon rains and
flooding in northern India has so far claimed about 900
lives.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Heather Embee, KB3TZD, has
the latest on the role being played by that nations ham
radio community:

--

Actually the latest word comes from Jayu Bhide, VU2JAU, who
is the National Coordinator for Disaster communication in
India.  He reports that amateur radio storm relief
operations have been using 7.073 and 14.160 MHz for inter-
region disaster relief communications.  The messages they
are handling are being relayed by radio to authorities in
the cities of Gwalior, Calcutta, New Delhi, Vadodra, Kerala
and Hyderabad.

VU2JAU says that a relief team of four hams will soon be
continuing this work with a further list of volunteer ham
radio operators being made ready to go to the region if they
are needed.   As this report is being prepared it appears
that the storm ravaged area will continue to receive monsoon
relief communications through amateur radio messaging for
some time to come.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heater Embee, KB3TZD,in
Berwick, Pennsylvania.

--

The unexpected heavy monsoon rains affected pilgrims and
tourists in the holy area in the foothills of the Himalayas
on the Indo-Tibet border. (VK3PC)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  INDIA TOWN HIT BY FLOODS EMBRACES HAM RADIO

The recent rain damage in the area of Valparai, India  has
led to a decision by civic leaders to install a permanent
ham radio station in the town in the coming months.   The
station will be used to link the local emergency
communications office to the amateur radio operators around
the world along with district office in Coimbatore and sub
office in Pollachi.

The Amateur Radio Club of Pollachihas promised to establish
the station free of cost and permission has been sought from
the government to proceed with the project.  Once
established, it would facilitate emergency communication
during the time of crisis and disasters.

Meantime, an experimental station was set up on Saturday,
July 6th and is functioning as a tool for storm relief and
forest officials.  Based on their positive feedback, a radio
club spokesperson says that permission is expected to be
granted shortly and the ham radio emergency communications
station should be a reality in about month.
(Times of India)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  HAMS READY FOR TROPICAL STORM CHANTAL

Meantime on this side of the world comes word that the
Caribbean Emergency and Weather Net was activated the night
of July 8th in preparation of the imminent arrival of
Tropical storm Chantal in the vicinity of Barbados and the
Windward Islands.  This net which operates on 3.815 MHz will
continue to function until the storm and its effects have
dissipated from that area.  Hams elsewhere are requested to
please keep this frequency clear until further notice.

Meantime on Tuesday, July 9th Professor Arnie Coro, CO2KK,
posted a report over the VHF Reflector.  It said that Cuba's
national weather service 5 days track forecast for tropical
storm Chantal showed a cone of probability that may involve
the Florida Keys.  At that time the storm was moving at the
very high speed of 26 miles per hour.  (CO2KK, VHF
Reflector, Facebook, other reports)

**

RADIO LAW:  ARRL SAYS NO TO ENCRYPTED HAM RADIO
COMMUNICATIONS

The ARRL is calling on the FCC to deny a Petition for Rule
Making in RM-11699.  This is a request that seeks to permit
the encryption of certain amateur communications during
emergency operations or related training exercises.  Amateur
Radio Newsline's Norm Seeley, KI7UP, is here with the
details:

--

As we previously reported, earlier this year the FCC
accepted for filing a Petition for Rulemaking from Don
Rolph, AB1PH, designated as RM-11699 and put it on public
notice. In it Rolph suggested that an additional exception
to Part 97.113 be made to permit encrypted communications
when hams are participating in emergency services operations
or related training exercises which may involve information
covered by medical privacy requirements or other sensitive
data.  This could include logistical information concerning
medical supplies, personnel movement or any other data
designated by Federal authorities managing relief or
training efforts.

But on July 8th the ARRL filed to oppose the AB1PH rules
change request.   The ARRL says that in its view there is no
factual or legal basis for the assumption that encryption of
transmissions is necessary in order to continue and enhance
the utility of amateur radio emergency and disaster relief
communication.  The ARRL also characterized as erroneous the
assumption that encryption of certain information may be
required under the provisions of the Health
Insurance Portability and Accountability or HIPPA Act.

The ARRL is not alone in this view.  Several other
commenters on RM-11699 have also pointed out that the
restrictions imposed by HIPPA can be overlooked in time of a
dire emergency.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Norm Seeley, KI7UP, in
Scottsdale, Arizona.

--

You can read an in-depth report on why the ARRL decided to
oppose RM-11699 at tinyurl.com/arrl-against-encryption.  So
far close to 280 comments have been filed on RM-11699 with
most of those in opposition to it.  You can read them on the
FCC's website beginning at tinyurl.com/encryption-
commentary.  (ARRL, FCC, Southgate)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  PROPOSED REVISIONS TO THE CANADIAN TABLE OF
FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS

What appears to be some good news for ham radio in Canada.
This with word from Radio Amateurs of Canada of some
proposed changes to frequency allocations in that nation
that will provide more spectrum to use.

First up in the proposed revisions is the inclusion of a new
allocation running between 472 and 479 KHz.  This 600 meter
band was long sought and won at the 2012 World
Radiocommunications conference held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Also some good news based on what's not seen in the
proposal.  Radio Amateurs of Canada officials noted that the
proposed revisions in the nations frequency allocation table
did not include the addition of an appropriate Canadian
Footnote for the range  5230 to 5240 KHz.  This for
authorization of the amateur service on 60 meter spot
frequency channels as petitioned in 2010 and the subject of
the Industry Canada Proposal issued in May of 2012.

Radio Amateurs of Canada calls this simply an omission and
should not mean an unfavorable decision on the 5 MHz
channels.  Instead, from all indications the national
society says that there is good reason to believe the 60
meter decision will be favorable to Canadian radio amateurs
and is imminent.

The Canada Gazette notice that proposes these changes also
invites public comments on the proposed revisions.
Following the review of comments by the nations
telecommunications regulator the allocation decisions will
be announced and a revised edition of the Canadian Table of
Frequency Allocations will be issued.

The public response period to the Gazette notice ends on
September 27th.  (RAC)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  PROPOSED REVISIONS TO THE PORTUGUESE
NATIONAL TABLE OF FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS

The Portuguese National Communications Authority has
approved a draft decision to amend the nations National
Table of Frequency Allocations.  This to give that nations
radio amateur's additional operating spectrum at some future
date.

According to the regulatory authority, if approved the
revisions would provide hams in Portugal with access to the
472 to 479 kHz frequency band for the amateur service.  It
would also alter some of the conditions governing access to
the 50-52 MHz and 1270-1300 MHz bands for access by that
nation's ham radio community.

This draft decision is submitted to the general consultation
procedure as provided for under the Portuguese Electronic
Communications Law whereby interested parties are given a
period of 20 working days in which to comment.  This means a
July 26th commentary cutoff date.  (Portuguese National
Communications Authority)

**


BREAK 1

With you 52 weeks a year, we are the Amateur Radio Newsline,
heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
Two Rivers Amateur Radio Club repeater, W3OC, serving
Monroeville, Pennsylvania.

(5 sec pause here)


**

SURVEY:  ARE THOSE BEEPS NEEDED

As you just heard in our break, there are five one second
tones that do two things.  For the listener they denote the
fact we are in a station identification break.  On a
technical level they keep the few tape machines left feeding
phone lines from resetting mid newscast.

But as we plan for the future we need to know if anyone else
is using these tones for any other purpose during the replay
of this newscast.  We have heard stories that some repeaters
or Echolink nodes use the beep tones for cueing purposes,
but we are far from certain if this is actually the case.

If you are among those who require the tones please drop us
a note to newsline (at) arnewsline (dot) org and let us
know.  And please only those who require the tones respond.
To which we add our sincere thank you in advance.
(ARNewslineT)

**

RADIO LAW:  FCC MODIFIES CALIFORNIA HAMS LICENSE AFTER VEC
SAYS IT MADE CLERICAL ERROR

The FCC has gone ahead with the license class modification
of a California ham after it was notified by the supervising
V-E-C that it had made a clerical error.  One that had
awarded James H. Schofield, KI6JIM, a General Class ticket
even though he was only eligible for Technician class
privileges.

As previously reported, on November 29, 2012, the W5YI
Volunteer Examiner Coordinator sent a data file to the
Commission requesting that Schofield's operator license be
upgraded from Technician Class to General Class.  Based on
this application, the Commission granted Schofield a General
Class license on November 29, 2012.

But on May 30, 2013, the W5YI VEC notified the Commission
that it had made a typographical error in the original 2012
data file and that a licensee other than Schofield had
qualified for a General Class operator license.  As a result
the FCC proposed to modify the license for Station KI6JIM to
show Technician Class operator privileges.

The Order Proposing Modification was released this past June
4th.  Schofield did not protest the proposed modification of
his license within the requisite thirty-day time frame.   As
such Schofield is deemed to have consented to the proposed
modification.  (FCC)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  NYC POLICE TAKE DOWN UNLICENSED BROADCAST
STATION

Running an unlicensed broadcast radio station in the Metro
New York City area can put you behind bars.  Amateur Radio
Newsline's Stephan Kinford, N8WB, reports:

--

Detectives in New York City have arrested two men for
allegedly operating an unlicensed radio station on 104.7
MHz.  The Kings County District Attorney's Office says Seon
Bruce and Solomon Malka are charged with making unauthorized
radio transmission which is a class-A misdemeanor.

To thwart the illegal operation, detectives bought
advertising on the station and an FCC engineer traced the
signal to a rooftop antenna on a 50-story building in
Manhattan.  The detectives then seized the transmission
equipment.

According to the Kings County District Attorney, Solomon
told them he installed the stations gear and knew the
station didn't have a license.  Investigators also found
equipment for another station, 91.7 MHz, which was on the
air in June.  Solomon is reported to have told detectives he
had a license for that station but the FCC disputes that
claim.

The defendants have been charged with a class-A misdemeanor
of making unauthorized radio transmissions.  If convicted
under New York law, they could serve up to a year in jail.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephan Kinford, N8WB,
in Wadsworth, Ohio.

--

According to the FCC, New York has seen more
enforcement against unlicensed operations than any other
state, with 330 official actions including citations, fines
and shutdowns logged against pirate radio stations since
2003.  Previously it was Florida that held this rather
dubious distinction.  (FCC, NYPD, Daily News, others)

**


ENFORCEMENT:  FCC UPHOLDS $25,000 FINE AGAINST IDAHO
BROADCASTER

The FCC has upheld fines totaling $26,000 against Salmon
River Communications.  This, for not filing for renewal on
time and continuing to operate two stations after their
authorizations had expired.

Salmon River Communications owns radio stations KSRA AM and
FM in Salmon River, Idaho.  According to the commission
their renewals were due in June 2005, four months before
their licenses would expire.  The licensee did seek Special
Temporary Authority to remain in operation,  but those also
ran out.

The commission eventually renewed both licenses and in 2011
proposed the fines. The agency now says that it has not
received a response from Salmon River.  Saying no
circumstances warrant a reduction or cancellation, the
commission upheld the penalties and said Salmon River has 30
days to pay or file a further appeal.  (FCC, RW)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  DETROIT MI EMERGENCY RESPONSE SYSTEM FAILS

Detroit, Michigan is the latest city to receive national
news media attention for the failure of its P25 digital
trunked radio system.  The system failed during the 4th of
July holiday weekend creating what was described as havoc
for first responders.

The radio system is for communication between 911
dispatchers and Detroit's police, fire and Emergency
Management Service crews.  It failed at around 5:30 a.m.
Friday morning, July 5th causing a backlog of hundreds of
calls.

Michigan State Police stepped in to allow Detroit's
emergency system to use the state's communication system.
This backup was used for several days while crews worked to
restore the Detroit system.

Detroit Police Spokeswoman Sergeant Eren Stephens said that
during the initial down time there had been some 60 priority
one and more than 170 non-emergency calls that had backed up
because of the issue.

Like most new digital systems, Detroit's is dependant on
centralized computer control.  This means failure of the
central processing system can bring the entire system to a
halt.  And while Detroit does have a mirrored back-up system
in place it apparently had ever been fully tested and it
also failed leading to state to step in.  More is on-line at
tinyurl.com/detroit-radio-down.  (WXYZ, other published
reports)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  HAM RADIO SAILOR MAKES IT AROUND THE
WORLD

Some names in the news:  A ham radio operator who is
believed to be the oldest female sailor to make a solo, non-
stop circumnavigation of the globe has finally reached her
goal.  This with word that seventy-year-old Jeanne Socrates,
KC2IOV, is back on land.

Socrates set out from Victoria's Inner Harbor in her 36 foot
cruiser Nereida in October of 2012.  A note on her website
says she returned to the harbor just before 3 a.m. Monday,
July 8th.  The pre-dawn arrival ended several days of
anticipation as light winds along the west coast of British
Columbia, Canada, stalled her return, which was expected on
July 5th.

This was not Socrates first attempt at such a voyage.  She
has made two previous attempts to sail solo, non-stop,
around the world.  The first ended in Cape Town, South
Africa in 2009 and the second journey concluded in January
2011 with damage to her  boat in a storm off Cape Horn.
During all three trips KV2IOV reportedly held regular
schedules with her support team and also made lots of other
QSO's while at sea.

Socrates, a grandmother and retired teacher is raising money
for Marie Curie Cancer Care.  This is a United Kingdom-based
program that provides free home nursing for terminally ill
cancer patients. (CFAX, The Canadian Press, QRZ.com)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  A WEBSIITE FOR HAM RADIO ROYALTY

A website has been created that lists those members of Royal
families that its creators believe may have held amateur
radio callsigns.  The page is at tinyurl.com/royal-ham-radio
and is sponsored by the Highfields Amateur Radio Club in the
U.K..  (M5AKA)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  BURT WEINER K6OQK TO SPEAK ON THE
HISTORY OF HAM RADIOS EARLIEST REPEATERS

If you have in interest in the early development of
repeaters and have some free time, then listen up.  The July
19th meeting of the Los Angeles California-based San
Fernando Valley Amateur Radio Club will feature a one-time
presentation on the history of Southern California's K6MYK
and WA6TDD repeaters presented by Burt Weiner, K6OQK, who is
one of the people who made it all happen.

It was the late Arthur M. Gentry, W6MEP, who built the
nations first truly automatic repeater.  Its call sign was
K6MYK, and it operated from above the Hollywood sign on Mt.
Lee beginning back in the late 1950's.  Its history was
chronicled in the March, 2004, QST feature titled "Once Upon
a California Hilltop."

Burt Weiner, K6OQK, was a prot�g�e of Art Gentry.  He became
involved in Amateur Radio in the early 1950's while in Jr.
High School.  He went ob to build and maintain the nations
second truly successful automatic control repeater.  WA6TDD
later known as WR6ABE was sited atop Mt. Wilson and went on
the air in 1962.  Burt ran it through the era of conversion
from AM to FM operation that lasted into the 1970's.

Burt Weiner's professional background is in broadcast
engineering, antenna systems and measurement systems design.
His talk will be primarily the history of WA6TDD with parts
touching on Art and Millie
Gentry, the K6MYK repeater and the part they played in his
building WA6TDD.  He will be open to questions after and
maybe even during the presentation.

This very special presentation will take place on Friday
night June 19th beginning at 7:30 p.m. Pacific time.  The
venue is the 5th floor penthouse of Northridge Medical
Center Hospital, 18300 Roscoe Boulevard on Northridge
California.  The talk will also be video recorded for
general release at some later date.

For those interested in the history of this aspect of our
hobby it should prove to be a very interesting evening to
say the least.  (ARNewsline)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  From the
United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
with links to the world from our only official website at
www.arnewsline.org and being relayed by the volunteer
services of the following radio amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

RADIO IN SPACE:  GOOGLE PROJECT LOON INTERFERENCE CONCERNS

A broadband communications experiment that involves a series
of balloons circling the globe is bringing some anxiety to
other spectrum users.  Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, is in the
newsroom with the details:

--

Concerns have been raised about possible interference from
the 2400 MHz and 5800 MHz transmitters on the Google Project
Loon High Altitude Balloon project.  Google launched 30
balloons from New Zealand which transmit wideband 2400 MHz
and 5800 MHz signals and concerns have been raised about the
interference they could cause to radio astronomy.

The United Kingdom's Register reports that when Google
engineer Brad Tucker was contacted about the problem.  He
said that Google had identified locations where Loon
balloons might interfere with radio astronomy.  He said that
these transmitters had been shut down until these balloons
had floated out of range.

But its not just radio astronomers that are worried about
interference generated by the Google Loon balloons. The
Amateur Radio and Amateur Satellite Services are also
concerned about deterioration to their communications
especially in the area of weak signal operations.  This is
because both use some of the same frequencies that Project
Loon is transmitting on.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
in Los Angeles.

--

Google eventually plans to send some 300 balloons around the
world at the southern fortieth parallel that would provide
broadband coverage to New Zealand, Australia, Chile, and
Argentina.  The company hopes to eventually have thousands
of balloons flying in the stratosphere at an altitude of 20
km relaying broadband almost world-wide.  More about this
project is on the web at www.google.com/loon  (Southgate)

**

HAM RADIO NEAR SPACE:  PICO BALLOONS - A NEW HAM RADIO FAD

The latest fad in ham radio near space experimentation, at
least in the United Kingdom, appears to be the so-called
pico balloons.  The small foil party balloons can only carry
ultra light payloads typically weighing less than 100 grams.
This presents a challenge to the builders to produce a
transmitter, GPS, batteries and antenna that are small and
light enough to be taken aloft.

Balloons such as these do not go to extremes of altitude but
can float at between 10,000 to 20,000 feet for an extended
period.  Their 434 MHz transmitters can have a radio range
of up to 900 miles.

Several pico balloons carrying 434 MHz payloads weighing
less than 100 grams launch were to be launched last weekend
from locations in Great Britain.  James Coxon, M6JCX,  was
to launch one operating on  434.175 MHz USB transmitting
RTTY at 50 baud.  David Bowkis, M0MDB, also was to have
launched one transmitting on 434.250 MHz running ASCII at 50
baud.

The free balloon software dl-fldigi can be used to decode
many different amateur radio digital modes and is available
in Windows, Mac or Ubuntu Linux versions.   (UK Space,
Southgate)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  FITSAT-1 DEORBITS AND BURNS UP

The FITSAT-1 ham radio Cube-Sat is reported to have de-
orbited and burned  up in the Earth's atmosphere in the
early hours of Thursday, July 4th.  According to Takushi
Tanaka, JA6AVG, of the Fukuoka Institute of Technology
FITSAT's last signal was received byJA0CAW at 03:07 UTC.
FITSAT-1's low orbit meant its lifespan was limited to just
9 months but in that time it was able to achieve a number of
technology firsts.  (FITSAT)

**

WORLDBEAT:  UK RADIO CLUB LAUNCHES STREAMING ATV CHANNEL

The United Kingdom-based Sheffield Amateur Radio Club has
its own streaming TV channel thanks to the British Amateur
Television Club.  The channel will be used to stream live TV
from special events attended by the club's communication
trailer GX3RCM and viewable on-line at tinyurl.com/gx3rcm.
More information is at sheffieldarc.org.uk. (Southgate)

**

WORLDBEAT:  ILLW REGISTRATION REACHES 300

Registration number 300 for the International Lighthouse and
Lightship Weekend has been awarded to the Luehe Lower
Lighthouse in Germany.  Located in that country's Lower
Saxony region will be activated during the fun-event on
August the 17th and 18th by avid contester Rainer Arndt
DL9OE.

Now in the 16th year the annual event is always held on the
third full weekend of August to promote public awareness of
old marine navigation methods, amateur radio and foster
international goodwill.  Guidelines and online registration
information are at illw.net.  (VK3PC)

**

ON THE AIR:  GRID SQUARE EXPEDITION TO SCOTLAND

On the air, listen out for 2E1EUB will be on the air from
Scotland as 2M1EUB for 14 days beginning August 5th.  He
will actually be driving around that nation to provide other
hams with new grid squares that they have not yet worked.
Activity will be on 160, 80 and 2 meter SSB along with
several satellites.   He does accept E-mails and will
arrange schedules to work him at 2e1eub (at) amsat (dot)
org. (VHF Reflector)

**

ON THE AIR:  4X19MG CELEBRATES MACCABIAH GAMES

Members of the Israel Amateur Radio Club
will activate 4X19MG between July 18th to the 30th in honor
of the 19th Maccabiah Games.  The Maccabiah is an
international Jewish athletic event, held in Israel every
four years.  QSL via 4Z1TL.  (IARC)

**

DX

In DX, word that K4ZW, will be on the air from Addis Ababa
until July 19th.  He plans to operate from  the Ethiopian
Amateur Radio Society club station ET3AA and notes that most
of his time will be spent on CW, but is going to try some
RTTY as well.  QSL via N2OO

RK4FF will once again be active as 6V7S from Senegal through
July 16th and again from October 22nd to November 27th.  His
operations will probably be on 80 through 10 meters using
CW, SSB and RTTY.  QSL via RK4FF.

JJ2NYT, will be active as 9H1N from Malta between August 2ns
to the 5th. Activity will be holiday style on 40 through 10
meters using CW and SSB.  QSL only via his home callsign.

CT2HPM is now active as D2CT from Luanda, Angola.  He will
be there until July 26th operating 20 through 10 meters
using mostly PSK31 and RTTY.  QSL via his home callsign.

Lastly, VU2UR will be operational as AT20RRC from Bangalore,
India through the end of July. His activity is to celebrate
20th anniversary of the Russian Robinson Club with stations
on the High Frequency  bands. QSL electronically to AT20RCC
via eQSL.

(Above from various DX news sources)

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  THE CASE OF THE STRANGE RADIO SIGNALS FROM
SPACE

And finally this week, if you are a ham with an interest in
radio astronomy, then this is for you.  Bruce Tennant,
K6PZW, reports:

--

If you've been waiting to hear mysterious radio signals from
space, then now may be the right time to tune in.  This as
an international team of astronomers has detected four
powerful bursts that appear to come from billions of light-
years away.  At that distance, the radio pulses would each
have put out in a few thousandths of a second the same
amount of energy that our Sun would take 10,000 years to
produce.

The bizarre signals came to light as part of the High Time
Resolution Universe survey.  This is a project using the 64-
meter Parkes radio telescope in Australia to search the sky
for radio signals from pulsars.  These are the stellar
signal generators that are believed to be caused by super-
novas.

Because the pulsars we detect lie in our own galaxy,
astronomers mostly look near the Milky Way when hunting for
these dead stars.  But when Dan Thornton of the University
of Manchester in the United Kingdom and Australia
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research
Organization started digging through the data he stumbled
across the four signal bursts.  After scientists
extrapolated the data across the entire sky, they concluded
that perhaps 10,000 of these blasts are happening every day.
Its only a matter of finding them.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, in
Los Angeles.

--

According to researcher Thornton, it's still unknown as to
what these signals are, but at least it's no longer a
mystery that they actually exist.  More about these
interesting radio signal from space is on line at
tinyurl.com/powerful-signals-from-space  (Various Sources)

**


NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC
Communicator, CQ Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX
Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain, the RSGB, the Southgate
News, TWiT-TV and Australia's WIA News, that's all from the
Amateur Radio NewslineT.  Our e-mail address is newsline
(at) arnewsline (dot) org.  More information is available at
Amateur Radio Newsline'sT only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org.  You can also write to us or support us
at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa
Clarita California, 91350

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Jeff Clark, K8JAC, in Charleston, West Virginia, saying
73 and we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline is Copyright 2013.  All rights
reserved.

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