Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1906 - February 21, 2014

08:14 Fernando Luiz de Souza 0 Comments








Amateur Radio Newsline™ report number 1906 with a release
date of February, 21 2014 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST.  A ham in the United Kingdom hears
China's lunar rover; the public is invited to comment on FCC
Process Reform; Canadian hams get permanent access to a very
low frequency band; hams in Bulgaria get three new bands;
South Africa hams told that they must comply with 12 point 5
kilohertz spacing for 2 meter repeaters; two teens bring a
dormant AMSAT net back to life and a trip back in time and
space to the beginnings of the universe.  All this and more
on Amateur Radio NewslineT report number 1906 coming your
way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RADIO FROM SPACE:  UK HAM LOCATES SIGNAL FROM CHINA'S LUNAR
ROVER

China's Jade Rabbit Lunar Rover is not dead after all.  This
after its signal was heard and confirmed by a United Kingdom
radio amateur.  Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, is in the newsroom
with the latest:

--

The Jade Rabbit rover was launched as a part of China's
Chang 3 mission to the Moon last December 1st .   On
December 14th the Chang 3 landed on the Moon with the first
signals copied at UHF-Satcom around 17:18 UTC on that same
day.   The Jade Rabbit Lunar Rover was then deployed with
its transmitter activated and signals detected on
8462.080MHz running in a low rate BPSK mode.

The rover functioned well until the lunar nighttime set in.
The missions Command Control center was expecting the rover
to contact Earth on February 12th  after it had it endured
its second lunar night.  Since it did not transmit any
signals, the rover was officially declared permanently
inoperative.

But on that same day a signal from the Jade Rabbit was heard
by a ham radio operator in the United Kingdom.  Paul Marsh,
G7EYT, who also holds the call M0EYT reported detecting the
missing rover on 8462.078 MHz.  This has brought new hope to
the China's Command Control personnel that the overall
mission might be saved.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
in the Newsroom in Los Angeles

--

Needless to say that is quite an accomplishment for ham
radio.  Especially after those in command of the project
seemed to think that all might be lost.  The complete story
of how the Jade Rabbit was found along with spectral
pictures of the Chang mission is at www.uhf-
satcom.com/amateurdsn/chang-e-3/    (Southgate)

**

TEECOMMUNICATIONS LAW:  PUBLIC INVITED TO COMMENT ON FCC
PROCESS REFORM

The Federal Communications Commission is inviting comment on
what it terms as its Process Reform.   Among the agency's
goals is eliminating or streamlining outdated rules that are
candidates for such action.  This, as a result of
marketplace or technology changes that render them no longer
necessary in the public interest.

Interested parties may file comments on the Report and the
proposed recommendations on or before March 31, 2014.  All
comments should reference GN Docket No. 14-25.  Comments may
be filed electronically using the Internet by accessing the
agency's Electronic Comment Filing System at
apps.fcc.gov/ecfs.  The entire notice can be read on-line at
tinyurl.com/FCC-rules-reform  (FCC)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  CANADIAN HAMS GET PERMINANT ACCESS TO 135
KHZ BAND

Industry Canada has approved permanent access by Canadian
radio amateurs to the Low Frequency band from 135.7 to 137.8
kHz, subject to certain conditions put in place in late
2009.   This includes a maximum emission bandwidth of
only100 Hz as well as a maximum Effective Radiated Power
level not to exceed one watt.  Also, as this is a shared
allocation which Canadian hams many not cause interference
to the primary users of this spectrum including stations in
other nations that operate radio-navigation services.

The addition of permanent access to 135.7 to 137.8 kHz is a
direct result of Canada implementing changes from the 2007
World Radiocommunication Conference which added amateur
radio use of this spectrum on a secondary basis.  This has
now been included in the newly updated Canadian RBR-4
Standards for the Operation of Stations in that nation's
Amateur Radio Service.  (RAC, VE3YV, VE3KI, VE3IQ)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  NEW AMATEUR BANDS FOR BULGARIA

Several new and one expanded amateur bands have been
introduced to ham radio in Bulgaria.  In the near future, L-
Zed prefix amateurs will be able to use bands 472 to 479
kHz, 5.250 to 5.450 MHz and 70.0 to 70.5MHz.  In addition,
the 160 meter band will be extended up to 2 MHz.  All those
new and increased allocations are on a secondary, non-
interfering basis with the primary users of these spectrum
parcels.  (Southgate, others)

**

RADIO LAW:  SOUTH AFRICA AMATEUR RADIO REPEATERS MUST COMPLY
WITH 12.5 KHZ CHANNEL SPACING

South Africa's telecommunications regulator ICASA has
confirmed that all 2 meter amateur radio repeaters must
comply to the 12.5 kHz channel spacing.  This, during a
recent meeting between the South African Radio League and
that regulatory body.

While most South African repeaters operating in the two
meter band do comply with 12.5 kHz spacing there are however
still a few repeaters that still use the older 25 kHz inter-
system spacing. The South African Radio League and ICASA
will meet again during March for a workshop to address
repeater frequency coordination and other operational
issues.  (SARL)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  TASMANIA POLICE CHASE DOWN OLD ANALOG EPIRB

From Tasmania comes word of a rather messy rubbish search to
locate an errant signal from a discarded older style
emergency locator beacon.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Jim
Meachen, ZL2BHF, has the details:

--

Police in northern Tasmania had to use a rescue helicopter
to locate an errantly discarded Emergency Position
Indicating Radio Beacon, or EPIRB.  Then a ground crew had
to dig through the rubbish dump to located the unit and
manually disable it.

Personal radio beacons such as this are a safety measure
used by people mostly while at sea or traveling in remote
areas.  According to Jim Linton, VK3PC, who passed along the
story, these older style beacons need to be disposed of
properly.  That means at minimum removing the battery before
casting them aside.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF, in
Nelson, New Zealand.

--

As of February 2010, analogue beacons on 121.5 MHz are not
monitored by satellite and only 406 MHz EPIRB signals are
now being listened for.   (VK3PC)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  RBDS GETS PRAISE FOR DELIVERING ALERTS

Back here in the United States, a report validates the
benefits of using the Radio Broadcast Data System or RBDS to
deliver alerts to individuals during emergencies.

Congress wanted the Federal Emergency Management Agency to
study how RBDS could be used with its Integrated Public
Alert and Warning System.  FEMA now says to improve the
speed and penetration of federal, state and local emergency
alerts and warnings, the agency is evaluating RBDS to
increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the alerting
distribution infrastructure.

One of the upshots that could potentially be seen because of
the report is finding more cellular telephones to be
equipped for FM broadcast reception so that that they can
act as RBDS receivers as well.  More is on-line at
tinyurl.com/RBDS-2014  (RW)

**

DX UP FRONT:  AMSTERDAM ISLAND FT5ZM DXPEDITION CLOSES DOWN

In DX up-front, the on-the-air portion of the Amsterdam
Island FT5ZM DXpedition has come to an end, although the job
of sending out QSL cards remains.  During its stay, the
DXpedition team logged on the order of 170,000 contacts on
SSB, CW and RTTY.  Amsterdam Island has been the seventh
most sought after DXCC entity according to the ClubLog Most
Wanted List.

(GB2RS)

**

DX UP FRONT: WESTERN SAHARA IN MARCH

DX-World.net is reporting that 3Z9DX is planning to operate
stroke S0 from the Western Sahara territory for one week
only sometime in mid-March.  The exact dates are yet to be
determined but his activity will be on 40 through 10 meters
using SSB only.  QSL this one via 3Z9DX.

**

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station.  We are the Amateur
Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the KJ3LR repeater on 145.110 MHz serving
Bradenton, Florida.


(5 sec pause here)


**

RADIO SAFETY:  IDAHO HAM SERIOUSLY INJURED IN TOWER REPAIR
ACCIDENT

A tower accident has seriously injured an Idaho ham.
Amateur Radio Newsline's Ralph Squillace, KK6ITB, is here
with the details of what happened:

--

Robert Galindo, KE7ADT, of Athol, Idaho, was critically
injured when the winching cable snapped while he was working
on his forty foot crank-up tower resulting in the loss of
his right hand and several fingers on his left hand.

The 52 year old Galindo, who goes by the name of BearPaw was
trapped and left hanging 20 feet up in the air when rescue
crews arrived at his home.  The accident, which occurred on
February 14th was witnessed by his wife Gail Perry, KE7ADN,
who called for the emergency assistance.

Multiple agencies responded to her 911 call, with help
arriving in under a half hour.  Timberlake Fire Protection
District officials say that it took rescuers another 20
minutes to raise the upper tower sections and to
extricate Galindo.

KE7ADT was then transported by a Life Flight helicopter to
the Kootenai Health Center in the city of Coeur d' Alene.
There he underwent more than 4 hours of surgery and at last
report we have was that  he was listed in critical condition
following the operation.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Ralph Squillace, KK6ITB,
reporting.

--

More on this story as information is made available.
(cdapress.com, nevadahamradio.com, N7UR)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  FCC ISSUES $7000 NAL TO TEXAS HAM

The FCC has issued Notice of Apparent Liability for
Forfeiture in the amount of $7000 to James R. Winstead,
KD5OZY, of Coleman, Texas.  This for his alleged violation
of Section 97.101(d) of the Commission's rules by operating
a radio transmitter to interfere with the communications of
other licensees.

This past January 21st, in response to several complaints of
intentional interference from amateur licensees operating on
7.195 MHz, an agent of the Enforcement Bureau's Dallas
Office used mobile direction finding to positively identify
the source of transmissions to the address of record for Mr.
Winstead's amateur radio station.

The agent monitored the transmissions for approximately 30
minutes.  During that time he heard the replay multiple
times of short sentences or conversations that had just been
transmitted and someone occasionally speak the word
"George."  The FCC alleges that  it was Winstead who
replayed recorded conversations so frequently that other
licensees were unable to complete their conversations.

The agent then identified himself to Mr Winstead and
requested to inspect the radio station located on the
premises.  The agent soon noted that Mr. Winstead's amateur
radio station was tuned to the frequency 7.195 MHz.  During
the inspection, Mr. Winstead showed the agent how he
recorded and retransmitted other amateur licensees'
communications.  He also admitted that he intentionally
interfered with amateur communications on 7.195 MHz and had
an ongoing disagreement with another amateur licensee named
George.

Now in its February 19th decision to propose the $7000 fine
the FCC says that the evidence in this case is sufficient to
establish that Mr. Winstead violated Section 333 of both the
Communications Act and Section 97.101(d) of the Rules.
Section 333 of the Communications Act prohibits any person
from willfully or maliciously interfering with or causing
interference to any radio communications of any licensed
station.  Section 97.101(d) of the FCC Rules states that no
amateur operator shall willfully or maliciously interfere
with or cause interference to any radio communication or
signal.

Winstead was given the customary 30 days to pay the proposed
fine or to file an appeal.  (FCC)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  WLS CHICAGO FACES $40000 FINE

A proposed $44,000 fine issued against legendary Chicago
broadcast station WLS-AM has now progressed to a forfeiture
order.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Hal Rogers, K8CMD, reports:

--

The case began in 2009 when the Enforcement Bureau received
a complaint that the station aired a program on behalf of
the Workers Independent News without making it clear that
the program was an ad, rather than a news story.  In its
response, WLS told the commission it aired several ads of
various lengths, promotional items, a pair of two hour
programs and an additional half hour program on behalf of
the group.  The station claimed that all of the ads
referenced Workers Independent News and identified the
narrator, but admitted that it did not specifically state
that the program material was sponsored, paid for and
provided by the group.

WLS asked that the proposed fine be reduced to $4000.  It
asserted that the FCC mechanically applied the base fine to
the 11 times the ads aired, which raised the fine to the
$44.000 level.  . The station also blamed the incident on
inadvertent employee error which the company says has now
been corrected.

But in denying the request the FCC noted that it has the
authority to fine a licensee up to $37,500 for each
violation of the sponsor ID rules or for each day of the
violation occurs up to a maximum of $375,000.   It went on
to say that it can find no legal basis on which to reduce
the amount noting that inadvertent employee errors are not
justification.  As such the FCC said the proposed amount
stands and the commission directed WLS to pay within 15 days
of the date it issued its decision.

I'm Hal Rogers, K8CMD.

--

At airtime it's not known if WLS plans any further appeals.
(FCC, RW)

**

TELECOMMUNICATIONS:  TWO LOS ANGELES TV STATIONS TO TRY
CHANNEL SHARING

Two Los Angeles,. California, television stations are going
to explore channel-sharing with the support of the major
wireless lobby.  This after The Wireless Association along
with stations KLCS and KJLA announce a channel-sharing pilot
project that responds to the Federal Communications
Commission's request to demonstrate the technical and legal
arrangements necessary to implement a successful channel-
sharing operation.

Once the two broadcast stations receive FCC approval, the
testing will take place throughout the remainder of the
first quarter of 2014.  Under the channel-sharing agreement,
KLCS and KJLA will conduct a series of tests that will
culminate in KLCS hosting KJLA's content and transmitting a
shared stream that will combine the two stations' primary
and multicast content.  KLCS and KJLA will also attempt a
variety of High Definition as well as Standard Definition
video feeds to confirm the feasibility and technical limits
of channel sharing between two unaffiliated broadcasters.
There will be no impact to KJLA's and KLCS' viewers during
this test.  More is at tinyurl.com/channel-sharing-study.
(TV Technology)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  ORANGE COUNTY NY SPRING HAMFEST APRIL 27

Turning to upcoming ham radio events, word that the Orange
County New York Amateur Radio Club will hold its spring 2014
hamfest on Sunday, April 27th from 8 a.m to 2 p.m..  The
venue this year is the Wallkill Community Center in the city
of Madison.  Free parking will be available with talk-in on
the local 146.76 MHz repeater that requires a 100 Hertz tone
to access.  For more information please contact Tom Ray by e-
mail to W2TRR (at) ocarc-ny (dot) com or check the clubs
website at tinyurl.com/ocarc-hamfest.  (OCARC NY)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  RCA TO HOLD MEMBERSHIP BREAKFAST IN LAS
VEGAS MARCH 27

The Radio Club of America will hold its Membership Breakfast
on March 27th.  This, in conjunction with the 2014
International Wireless Communications Expo Show in Las
Vegas, Nevada.

The featured speaker will be retired New York City educator
Carole Perry, WB2MGP.  The get-together will also see the
presentation of the IWCE Scholarship to 2013 Amateur Radio
Newsline Young Ham of the year Padraig Lysandrou, KC9UUS.

The venue for the Radio Club of America 2014 Membership
Breakfast is the Las Vegas Hotel in  Ballrooms E and F.
Cost is $15 per person in advance or $20 at the door.  Pre-
registration information in PDF format is on the web at
tinyurl.com/rca-member-breakfast-2014.  (RCA)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  FCC CHAIRMAN WHEELER TO SPEAK AT NAB

Some names in the news.  First up is FCC Chairman Tom
Wheeler who will provide the regulatory agency's keynote
talk at the 2014 National Association of Broadcasters
convention and trade show in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The NAB
says that Wheeler's address will take place on Tuesday,
April 8th, from 9 to 10 a.m..  At that time he is expected
to provide insight into his views on broadcasting and what
his expectations are on the regulatory front in the coming
years.  (NAB, TV News Check)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  VE4BOZ IS NEW RAC DEPUTY DIRECTOR FOR
MID WEST REGION

Bill Boskwick, VE4BOZ, has accepted the position of Radio
Amateurs of Canada Deputy Director for the Mid-West region.
Now living in Elm Creek, Manitoba, and officially retired,
Boskwick previously served as the District Officer for North
East Alberta Province with the Alberta Emergency Management
Agency .  He also served 32 years in military service with
Canadian Forces as a Communications Electronics Engineering
Officer and former deputy commander of the signals regiment
in Winnipeg.   (RAC)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  We are
the Amateur Radio Newsline with links to the world from our
only official website at www.arnewsline.org and being
relayed by the volunteer services of the following radio
amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

THE SWL SCENE:  PIRATE RADIO COMES ALIVE IN SYRIA

Pirate FM transmitters have hit the airwaves in pockets
across Syria.  WIA newsman VK4LAW has more:

--

Radio Watan is but one of more than a dozen opposition radio
stations that have sprung up since the start of the revolt
against the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad.

The stations are run by young civilian activists who played
an important role early in the uprising but have since been
targeted by government forces, for airing music and women's
voices.

The opposition radio stations are the most recent arrivals
on Syria's combative news media scene, where parties on both
sides try to shape perceptions of a conflict that is
conducted largely out of the public eye, because the
violence and government restrictions severely limit
journalistic access.

"It is much cheaper than TV and more accessible to the
public because the listener doesn't have to have electricity
to listen to you," said Obai Sukar, the director of Radio al-
Kul. "Just a small radio with two batteries, and you are
on."

With international news I'm Jason, VK4LAW.

--

The unlicensed radio outlets range from small operations
with a single transmitter that cover one town to complete
networks that broadcast into different Syrian provinces.
(WIA News)

**
HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  CAPE II HAM RADIO CUBESAT DESIGNATED LO-
75

The Cape II ham radio satellite is now known as the
University of Louisiana OSCAR 75 or LO-75.  This according
to  OSCAR Number Administrator Bill Tynan, W3XO, who
recently informed AMSAT mentor Nick Pugh, K5QXJ, of the
decision.

The CAPE II ham satellite operates on 145.825 MHz FM with a
CW beacon signing the call W5UL.  The bird also includes a
digipeaters, text to speech operation, a simplex repeater, e-
mail and tweet functions. The ground station software can be
downloaded at www.ulcape.org

(ANS)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  TWO TEENS BRING COLORADO AMSAT NET BACK ON
THE AIR

A pair of young hams in Colorado have brought that states
dormant AMSAT net back to life as we hear from Amateur Radio
Newsline's Amanda Alden, K1DDN:

--

15 year olds Skyler Fennel, KD0WHB and Jordan Walters,
KD0MLV have reestablished the Colorado AMSAT net.  The
purpose of the net is to discuss anything related to
Satellites.  Topics include informative bulletins on active
Satellites as well as  when they will be passing over the
area.

After hearing their enthusiasm on the Colorado Astronomy
net, its control station Burness Ansell, KI0AR encouraged
the two teens to pick up the AMSAT nets operation.  And
while the AMSAT net is only a few weeks old, its popularity
is already growing.  In fact, Internet listeners have been
tuning in from as far as Florida.

One of the ongoing topics has been if net members have ever
made contact through a satellite, and if so what antenna was
used.  The net operations also stands-by at times so that
members can go outside and view the International Space
Station passing overhead.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline,  I'm Amanda Alden, K1DDN in
Canon  City, Colorado

--

The Colorado AMSAT net takes place every Thursday evening at
7 pm local Mountain Time.  If you would like to listen or
check in, connect to Allstar node 29298 or 29436.  Operation
here in Canon City Colorado area is via the Rocky Mountain
Radio League repeater on 146.940 MHz.  (K1DDN)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  SCHEDULING AN ARISS SCHOOL CONTACT

Hams in the United States are reminded that there is a new
process for Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
school contact proposals.  For U-S schools to have an ARISS
contact, they must fill out a proposal, submit it to NASA,
and see if the school is selected.  If so, it will be placed
onto a future contacts list and a mentor will be assigned to
assist the school in planning for the event.  For more
information contact the NASA Teaching From Space Education
office by e-mail to JSC-TFS-ARISS (at) mail.nasa.gov.  If
you missed that kind of long address you can find it in the
print edition of this weeks Amateur Radio Newsline report.
(ARISS)

**

ON THE AIR:  SLOVAK REPUBLIC SPECIAL EVENT STATION
CELEBRATES LTE COMMUNICATIONS

On the air listen out for Slovak Republic station OM44LTE to
be on all of the ham bands until December 31st.  This
special event callsign is being used to celebrate the
allocation of frequencies for the Long Term Evolution or LTE
communications at 800 MHz, 1800 MHz and 2600 MHz in that
nation.  The station operator is OM3TOW who is a spokesman
of the nations Regulatory Authority for Electronic
Communications and Postal Services.   Electronic QSLing via
eQSL is preferred but  for those who require a paper QSL can
obtain one by sending theirs with a self addressed envelope
and sufficient return postage to OM3RP who is the QSL
manager for this operation.   (OPDX)

**

ON THE AIR:  THE ST. PATRICKS DAY AWARD

A group of Northern Ireland radio amateurs have introduced a
new award for hams who want to celebrate St. Patrick's Day
on the air.  While details are still a bit sketchy, the
organizers hope this to be an annual event every March 17th.
Those who want to participate as an award station or who
want more information on the event should go to
stpatrickaward.webs.com on the World Wide Web.  (MI0RYL,
Southgate)

**

DX

In DX comes word that JA1IST, will be on the air stroke FK
from New Caledonia between February 25th and March 1st.  His
activity will be holiday style on High Frequency bands.  QSL
to his home callsign or via the bureau.

F5MNW will once again be operational stroke FR from Saint
Leu between March 16th and April 8th.  Activity will be on
the HF bands using only CW.  QSL via his home call either
direct via the bureau.

F6ARC will be active stroke FG from Guadeloupe between March
11th to the  23rd.  Activity will be holiday style with a
focus on the 30, 17 and 12 meter bands and the lower bands
using 100 watts and operating Morse only.  QSL via FE1IDX
either direct or via the bureau.

ZL3TE will be operational as 3D2SE from Viti Levu Island
between April 11th and the 14th.   His main activity will be
in the Japan International DX CW Contest on April 12th and
13th.  Operations outside the contest will mainly be on CW,
with some digital modes. QSL to ZL3TE or electronically via
Logbook of the World.

G0VJG will be active stroke  J6 from St. Lucia between June
5th and the 18th.  Operation is likely to be on 40 through
10 meters using SSB only.  If you make contact please QSL
via G4DFI.

Lastly, several sources are reporting that a multi-national
team will be on a DXpedition to Malawi as 7Q7Q sometime late
November.  This will include an entry in the CQ World Wide
DX CW Contest.  At airtime this operation seems to be headed
up by ZS6RJ, and will be the same group that was active as
3DA0ET last year.  Look for more details to be forthcoming
in future newscasts.

(Above information from OPDX and other DX news sources)

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  A TRIP BACK IN TIME

And finally this week what can best be called a trip back in
time to the beginnings of the universe has been taken by
researchers down-under.  WIA news anchor Graham Kemp, VK4BB,
has the details:

--

A team led by astronomers from the Australian National
University has discovered the oldest known star in the
Universe, which formed shortly after the Big Bang 13.7
billion years ago.

It has now been confirmed using the Magellan telescope in
Chile.  The composition of the newly-discovered star shows
it formed in the wake of a primordial star, which had a mass
60 times that of our Sun.

The discovery has allowed astronomers for the first time to
study the chemistry of the first stars, giving scientists a
clearer idea of what the Universe was like in its infancy.

The star was discovered using the ANU SkyMapper telescope at
the Siding Spring Observatory, which is searching for
ancient stars as it conducts a five-year project to produce
the first digital map of the southern sky.

I'm Graham Kemp, VK4BB.

--

Once completed the project should help giver a clearer
understanding of the origin of the universe and the stars
that we on Earth see every night.  At least those seen in
the Southern Hemisphere.  (WIA News, Times of India)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC
Communicator, CQ Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX
Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain, the RSGB, the Southgate
News, TWiT-TV and Australia's WIA News, that's all from the
Amateur Radio Newsline.  Our e-mail address is newsline
(at) arnewsline (dot) org.  More information is available at
Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org.  You can also write to us or support us
at Amateur Radio Newsline, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa
Clarita California, 91350

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Jim Davis, W2JKD, saying 73 and we thank you for
listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline™ is Copyright 2014.  All rights
reserved.

0 comentários: