Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1935 - September 12 2014

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Podcast




Amateur Radio Newsline™ report number 1935 with a release
date of September 12th 2014 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST.   Radio Amateurs of Canada proposes
world-wide 60 meter ham radio allocation; China announces a
Lunar circling mission carrying amateur radio; Slow Scan
television is back on the air from the International Space
Station; the FCC announces an increase in the cost of a
United States vanity callsign and New Zealand hams get ready
to celebrate a major ham radio historical event.  Find out
the details are on Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1935
coming your way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RADIO POLITICS:  RAC SAYS CANADA WILL PROPOSE WORLDWIDE 60
METER ALLOCATION AT CITEL MEETING

Radio Amateurs of Canada has announced an agreement with
that that nation's telecommunications agencies to back the
society's formal proposal to create a world-wide 60 meter
ham radio allocation.  One that would be introduced for
discussion at WRC 2015.

According to the Radio Amateurs of Canada, this proposal
will be brought up  at the Inter-American Telecommunication
Commission or CITEL meetings in Merida, Mexico next month.
This, to be considered as Canada's position going in to WRC
2015 and proposes two 25 KHz band segments for amateurs.
The first would be from 5.330 to 5.355 MHz and the second
beginning at 5.405 and ending at 5.430 MHz.  Amateur access
would be on a non-interfering secondary basis which is a
standard operating approach already in force for several
other amateur radio allocations.

Radio Amateurs of Canada says that although this is very
good news, that the process is still ongoing.  The final
decision as to whether or not to create this new band will
be made next year at WRC 2015.  But says Radio Amateurs of
Canada, presenting a firm proposal from that nation with
specific frequencies for support by the International
Telecommunications Union Region 2 countries is a giant step
toward a favorable outcome next year.  (RAC)

**

RADIO LAW: OFCOM PROPOSES CHANGES TO UK HAM RADIO LICENSING

United Kingdom telecommunications regulator Ofcom has
published a 32 page proposal covering possible changes to
that nations amateur radio licensing.

In summary, the changes proposed are to drop what are termed
as Regional Secondary Locators; relax how U-K hams use their
callsigns on the air and provide access to 470 kHz and 5 MHZ
for Full Class license holders without the need for each to
file for special permission.  Also covered are several
changes dealing with club license ownership.

The consultation or commentary period on these proposals
runs through October 20th.  If approved these could come
into effect in April of 2015.  (Ofcom, Southgate)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  4M-LXS LUNAR HAM RADIO PAYLOAD

China plans to launch a Lunar circling spacecraft carrying a
ham radio experiment and returning it safely back to Earth.
Amateur Radio Newsline's Heather Embee, KB3TZD, has the
details:

--

Hot on the tail of last week's announcement by Japan that it
plans to send a ham radio payload to an asteroid comes word
that China will send some ham radio gear around our Moon and
then bring it back home.

The ham radio payload is known as 4M-LXS.  It was developed
by Lux Space of Betzdorf, Luxembourg and is slated for
launch as a part of a 196 hour China sponsored Moon circling
mission in late October.

The amateur radio payload will weigh only 30 pounds and will
transmit on 145.980 MHz plus or minus 2.9 kHz.  The
transmitter will be able to produce 1.5 watts fed to a
simple monopole antenna.  This should give a Signal to Noise
ratio comparable to amateur moon bounce signals returning at
the Earth's surface.

During the lunar flyby, the spacecraft will be 248,000 miles
from Earth and the distance to the Moon form the spacecraft
will be between 7500 to and 15,000 miles depending on the
final injection vector.

The continuous transmissions will start 77 point 8 minutes
after launch with five successive 1 minute sequences sent
during each 5 minutes transmit cycle.  The digital mode J T
65 B will be used so as to permit hams using the free W-J-S-
T software to decode it.

Lux Space is encouraging radio amateurs around the world to
receive the transmissions and send in data that they can
capture.  A Java client will be made available to
automatically send the decoded files to a central database.
That address will be made available before the flight on the
Lux Space Facebook page.  As we go to air, the launch is
expected to take place on October 23rd  at 1800 UTC.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline. I'm Heather Embee, KB3TZD,
reporting.

--

The ham radio payload 4M-LXS stands for the Manfred Memorial
Moon Mission.  It was named in memory of the late Professor
Manfred Fuchs who was the founder and chairman of OHB group,
of Bremen, Germany who passed away last April 27th.  A
complete mission outline is on the web at tinyurl.com/China-
Moon-Flyby.   (AMSAT-UK, LUXSpace, others)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  ISS SSTV BACK ON THE AIR

Slow Scan Television appears to be once again operational
from the International Space Station.

On Saturday, September 6, the ISS Slow Scan Television
experiment was activated from the Russian Service Module on
145.800 MHz FM.  This following an unsuccessful test back on
August 27th using the Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver and a new
cable that was not entirely successful.  At that time only
the carrier was detected but no SSTV audio tones were heard.

By September 6th the earlier issue was rectified and radio
amateurs on the ground were treated to a day of Slow Scan
television transmissions of images devoted to the life and
work of Russia's first cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. The pictures
were in the PD180 SSTV format with an additional voice
commentary.  (AMSAT-UK, ISS Fan Club, Southgate, others)

**

PROPAGATION:  LONG DURATION CME EXPECTED ON SEPTEMBER 12

If propagation seems a bit strange you can once again blame
it on our home star as we hear from Amateur Radio Newsline's
Bruce Tennant, K6PZW:

--

At 17:46 U-T-C on Wednesday September 10th, Sunspot AR2158
erupted producing an X1 point 6 level solar flare.  A flash
of ultraviolet radiation from the solar blast ionized the
upper layers of Earth's atmosphere, disturbing High
Frequency radio communications for more than an hour. More
importantly, the explosion hurled a Coronal Mass Ejection or
CME directly toward Earth.

Radio emissions from shock waves at the leading edge of the
CME suggest that the cloud tore away from the sun at speeds
as high as 3750 kilometers per second.  That would make this
a very fast moving storm, and likely to reach Earth before
on or before September 13th.

That eruption was preceded by a smaller event.  At zero
thirty hours on the morning of September 9th the magnetic
canopy of sunspot AR2158 erupted, producing a long-duration
solar flare and a bright Coronal Mass Ejection.

That CME which shot away from the Sun at nearly 1,000
kilometers a second had an Earth-directed component.  As
such, space scientists said that a glancing but powerful
blow was possible during the late hours of September 11th or
in the early hours of September 12th.

NOAA forecasters then issued a geomagnetic storm warning for
September 12th noting that the storm could reach a G2 class
moderate intensity event with auroras visible across
northern-tier US states such as Maine, Michigan, and
Minnesota.

Most of that celestial storm cloud was heading north of the
sun-Earth line, but not all.  A fraction of this earlier CME
will deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field
during the early hours of the 12th at about the time that
this newscast goes to air.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bruce Tennant K6PZW, in
Los Angeles.

--

In the past few weeks, glancing blows from minor C-M-E's
have sparked beautiful auroras around the Arctic Circle.
More information on these events is always available at
spaceweather.com.
(Published news reports.)


**

DX UP FRONT:  US ANTARCTICA STATIONS JOIN LOTW

In DX up-front, K1IED who is the QSL Manager for United
States Antarctic stations KC4AAA, KC4AAC and KC4USV says
that all three are now using Logbook of the World.  K1IED
notes that logs from the past two years, as well some that
are older have already been uploaded.  Also some other older
logs could be uploaded in the future as well.  (OPDX)

**

DX UP FRONT: FOLLOW-UP ON JH1AJT FOUNDATION FOR GLOBAL
CHILDREN ERITREA TRIP

And an update on our story last week concerning the visit of
Zorro Miyazawa, JH1AJT, to the State of Eritrea as a part of
a mission for the Foundation for Global Children.  According
to the latest news release he will be occupied by full of
meetings during Tuesday 16th to Friday 19th with very little
chance of getting on the air.  As of now, he hopes to
finally become operational on Saturday the 20th and Sunday
21st for a total of about 20 hours depending on the time he
needs to sleep.  He likely will shut down the station in the
evening of Monday the 22nd and should back in Japan by noon
on Wednesday September 24th.   (JA1TRC)

**

DX UP FRONT:  TIMOR LESTE SEPT 20 - 29

JA7LU and JA2VWG will be active as 4W6LU and 4W6DD,
respectively, Timor Leste between September 22nd and the
29th.  Their operation will be on 40 through 6 meters using
SSB and RTTY.  QSL each operator direct only via their home
callsign.  (OPDX)

**

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station.  We are the Amateur
Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the AD5JT repeater serving Lockhart, Texas.

(5 sec pause here)


**

RADIO LAW:  FCC RECONSIDERING BROADBAND ASPECT OF NET
NEUTRALITY

The Federal Communications Commission appears to be taking a
second look at how it treats wireless net neutrality.  This,
in response to public comments on the agency's proposed Open
Internet access rules.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Stephan
Kinford, N8WB,  reports:

--

Under the net neutrality rules the FCC put in place back in
2010, wireless broadband was set apart from wired Internet
access.  As a result, mobile service providers were given
more leeway to treat some streams of traffic differently
from others.  But that distinction is a major concern for
many of those who have commented on the agency's newest Net
Neutrality proposal.

According to news reports, FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler has
been quoted as saying that an open Internet encourages
innovation.  This says Wheeler drives network use leading to
more infrastructure build-out and that mobile wireless
broadband is a key component of that cycle.

Wheeler went on to say that mobile operators have claimed
they don't need the same degree of net neutrality regulation
as wired broadband providers because the wireless industry
is more competitive.   But says the FCC chairman, that logic
doesn't necessarily follow noting that there was plenty of
mobile carrier competition in the era before independent
applications stores when carriers approved all apps.

Wheeler said that while carriers should be allowed
reasonable management to ensure their networks run properly
that the FCC will hold them strictly to that definition.  He
also cited his recent letter to Verizon Wireless that
admonished the carrier's plan to throttle speeds for some
subscribers with unlimited data plans.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline. I'm Stephan Kinford, N8WB,
reporting.

--

According to FCC Chairman Wheeler, the wireless industry's
role has changed since 2010, with broadband services
delivering higher speeds that in some places as  compared
to wired services.  In 2010, there were only 200,000 Long
Term Evolution or LTE subscribers in the United States.
Now, only four years later there are 120 million, with the
potential of networks reaching 300 million residents.
(Published News Reports)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  TWO HAMS RECEIVE WARNINGS REGARING FAILING TO
PROPERLY ID

Two radio amateurs have been sent nearly identical warning
letters from the FCC.  This, concerning their alleged
failure to properly identify their stations at regular
intervals.

The letters which were sent to Gary E. Davis, W1IT and John
J. Krajewski, KB3MZQ.  In them, FCC Special Council Laura
Smith notes that each of the operators was heard at the
Commission's High Frequency Direction Finding Center this
past July 15th and 16th as failing to properly identify
their amateur stations while operating on 7.185 MHz.

In her letters to the operators Smith said that this type of
is contrary to the basis and purpose of the amateur radio
service as set out in Section 97.1 and is a violation of
Section 97.119(a) of the Commission's rules.  Smith went on
to say that the letters to the two hams are meant to serve
as a notice that, if operation of this type reoccurs after
their receipt that each operator could be subject to severe
penalties.  This includes the possibilities of a monetary
forfeiture, a modification proceeding to restrict the
frequencies upon which each may operate or even license
revocation.
(FCC)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  NEW ZEALAND EXPANDS PROHIBITION ON ANIMAL
TRAINING RF GEAR

New Zealand is cracking down on prohibited radio frequency
devices used for animal management.  This as the nation's
telecommunications authorities expand the terminology
applied to control the illegal import, distribution and use
of these units.

Most of the illegal devices operate on 151.82, 151.88,
151.94, 154.57 and 154.60 MHz as permitted in the United
States.  However, these frequencies are in direct conflict
with licensed land mobile services in New Zealand and cause
interference its users.  As a result of the expanded
terminology of the law New Zealand Customs is actively
intercepting such equipment when and where it is found
entering the country.  (NZART, WIA)

**

RADIO LAW:  MAJOR INCREASE ANNOUNCED FOR VANITY CALL FEE

The cost of getting a 10 year amateur radio vanity license
is going up by a lot but down by not by very much.  Sound
confusing?  Well here's what has taken place.

The current Vanity Fee is $16.10.  FCC had originally
anticipated that the new fee would be $21.60 but the Report
and Order released in late August came in at $21.40 or 40
cents less than originally proposed.

It should be noted that during its deliberations that the
commission had considered excluding broadcast auxiliaries,
FM translators and amateur radio vanity call fees from its
regulatory fees categories. The agency says that for now
that it is retaining these fees because it currently cannot
say for with certainty whether the cost of recovery and
burden on small entities outweighs the collected revenue; or
whether eliminating the fee would adversely affect the
licensing process.

The good news in all this is that the FCC says that it will
review these categories again at some future date.  None the
less, this new Vanity Call Sign fee increase is the largest
upward adjustment in many years.  All these fees go into
affect 30 days after publication in the Federal Register.
(FCC, RW)

**

RADIO LAW:  GAO SAYS FCC NEEDS MORE DATA ON TV STATION
SHARING AGREEMENTS

The Federal Communications Commission may have problems
ensuring that its regulations on shared arrangements by TV
stations meet the agency's goals on competition and
diversity.  This according to the United States General
Accounting Office is because it lacks basic data to do so.
Amateur Radio Newsline's Jim Davis, W2JKD, picks up the
story from here:

--

At the request of Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay
Rockefeller, the GAO spent a year investigating the impact
of shared service agreements between TV stations to jointly
sell advertising, produce and acquire programming, or to
share news or other equipment and resources.

Through interviews, a review of filings and documents, and a
case study in six markets, the GAO found it difficult to
objectively determine how such agreements affect the FCC's
policy goals of competition, localism and diversity in the
broadcasting industry.

In conclusion, the GAO found that TV stations were
increasingly sharing services but said that the limited data
on how prevalent those agreements were was not available.
Neither the FCC nor industry representatives could point to
a central data source to track such agreements.

I'm Jim Davis, W2JKD.

--

The entire report is available for download in PDF format at
tinyurl.com/gao-fcc-study
(GAO, Other published News Reports)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  SPRINGFIELD MISSOURI ADDED TO ROUTE 66
EVENT

The amateur radio bands have been very busy this past week
with the 15th annual "On the Air Route 66" special event.
This year was very important to hams in Springfield,
Missouri .  This is the recognized birthplace of Route 66
and in 2014 it was added to the list of cities along the
road that runs from Chicago to Los Angeles.

The Southwest Missouri Amateur Radio Club played host to
special event station W6R and kicked off the event with a
Field Day - like operation from the historic Route 66 park.
That's very close to the location where the telegram was
sent to Washington, DC in 1926 giving the highway the name
Route 66.   Certificates, decals and QSL cards are available
at W6JBT.org.  The event ends on September 15th.   (K9EID)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  WC8VOA CELEBRATES 70 YEARS OF BETHANY OH
VOA SITE

Ohio's West Chester Amateur Radio Association will be
celebrating the 70th anniversary of the decommissioned Voice
of America Bethany Relay site on Saturday, September 20th.
The club makes its home in the VOA building and operates
station WC8VOA which is the call they will use for the
commemorative event.

This location is also the home of the Voice of America
Museum of Broadcasting.  More about the museum can be found
on the web at www.voamuseum.org.  The clubs website is at
wc8voa.org.
(KD8VRX)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  VIDEOS OF ARRL CENTENNIAL CONVENTION NOW ON
LINE

Several produced videos from the recent ARRL Centenary
Convention in Hartford, Connecticut are now available on-
line.  The first two are from the hand of Randy Hall, K7AGE,
and combine an overview of the show itself with a visit to
ARRL Headquarters and League station W1AW.  Each run between
5 and 7 minutes and are quite entertaining.

The ARRL itself has also posted two videos.  The first is
the dedication of the Centennial Terrace at League
headquarters that took place just prior to the convention
itself.  The latest is the banquet address given by FEMA
Administrator, Craig Fugate, KK4INZ, on Friday, July 18th.

All four have been posted to YouTube.  Use the video sites
search bar with the words ARRL Centennial Convention to
locate them for your own viewing.  (ARNewsline)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  We are
the Amateur Radio Newsline with links to the world from our
only official website at www.arnewsline.org and being
relayed by the volunteer services of the following radio
amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

CHANGING OF THE GUARD:  TUSKEGEE AIRMAN AND
CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL RECIPIENT GEORGE MITCHELL K6ZE - SK

Lifelong amateur radio operator George T. Mitchell, K6ZE, of
San Diego, California, passed away on September 4th at the
age of 94.

During World War 2 George T. Mitchell was a member of the
pioneering black aviators known as the Tuskegee Airmen.
Mitchell, who built his first amateur station at age 12, was
responsible for teaching radio operations and the Morse code
to the aviation cadets at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama
from 1943 to 1946.  Following the war he went to work as a
civilian engineer for the United States Navy.  He retired to
San Diego, but eventually returned to work for the Scripps
Institute of Oceanography.  In 2007, in recognition with his
service with the Tuskegee Airmen, K6ZE, was a co-
recipient of the Congressional Gold Medal which is the
United States' highest civilian award.

George T. Mitchell, was a member of many amateur radio
groups, including the OMIK Amateur Radio Association, the
Air Force Flyers Club, the Old Old Timers Club and the
Quarter Century Wireless Association.  He was a member of
the B.O. Davis Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen's Association
and frequently spoke to school and civic groups about the
role these American heroes played in our nation's history.

George T. Mitchell, K6ZE, was preceded in death in by his
first wife Lillian.  He is survived by his second wife
D'Andrea Mitchell, sons Brian Stokes Mitchell of New York
City, George Mitchell, of Los Angeles, Richard Mitchell, of
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, daughter, Lorna Mitchell of
Fresno, California and stepsons Deon and Robert Coons, both
of San Diego.    (N7UR, Nevada Amateur Radio Newswire )

**

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY:  80M HAM RADIO BAND USED FOR 2012
WIDEBAND VIDEO AND DATA STUDY

A report on 2012 trials in the United Kingdom that used
3.613 MHz for 24 kHz bandwidth high-speed data and video
transmissions is now available to the public.  It notes that
by using modern modulation techniques an SSB channel can
support a raw data rate of 12,800 bits per second and wider
transmissions can support proportionally faster data rates.

In recent years there has been increasing military interest
in high-speed data transmissions on the High Frequency
bands.  Experiments have shown that color video at 15 frames
per second can be streamed on HF in a bandwidth of just 18
kHz.  That is the type of bandwidth that may possibly be
accommodated in the 29 MHz amateur radio band.

More information on this experimentation can be found in a
very fascinating article with the long title of "Wide Band
High Frequency Communications 2012 UK Trials Summary"
prepared by James Alexander of Rockwell Collins Corporation.
You can find it in cyberspace at tinyurl.com/hf-video-
testing  (KC0DGY, Southgate, others)

**

WORLDBEAT:  US-TO-VK TRANS-PACIFIC RECEPTION ON 630 METERS
REPORTED

The ARRL reports a radio amateur and medium-frequency
experimenter in Australia has received a 475.62 kHz
transmission from a radio amateur and Part 5 Experimental
operator in Texas.

John Langridge, KB5NJD, in Texas, also holds Experimental
license WG2XIQ.  He says that his digital WSPR signal was
heard in Australia on August 25 at 09:52 UTC by David Isele,
VK2DDI.

While the approximately 8710 miles covered is not a distance
record or a first for that part of the electromagnetic
spectrum, it does represent the sort of accomplishments that
hams in the United States might one day come to enjoy if
ever an amateur radio allocation is approved by the FCC.
More is on the web at tinyurl.com/630-meters-us-vk  (ARRL)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  MODE-J TRANSPONDER ON JAPAN'S NEW
NEXUS CUBESAT

The Japan AMSAT Association and students at the Nippon
University are jointly developing a CubeSat
called NEXUS which will have a 145 to 435 MHz Mode-J
transponder and a 38 dot 4 kilobits per second data
downlink.

NEXUS is an acronym of "Next Education Cross Unique
Satellite."  It will be one unit CubeSat with a mass of
between 2 and 3 pounds.  If all goes as planned, the tiny
bird will provide radio communications via its 145 to 435
MHz transponder; the ability to download 640 by 480
megapixel photos from its on-board camera; provide the data
downlink at 38 point 4 kilobits per second using QPSK and
more.

A launch opportunity for NEXUS has not yet been identified.
Nippon University students have previously developed the
SEEDS and SPROUT satellites.  (JAMSAT )

**

ON THE AIR:  ROLLS-ROYCE SPECIAL EVENT OCT 10 - 11

October 11th and 12th will see a forty eight hours hour
special event operation by the United Kingdom's Hucknall
Rolls Royce Amateur Radio Club station GB1RR.  This to
celebrate the 100th anniversary of the introduction of
company's famed Eagle aero engine.

By way of background, Rolls-Royce was asked by the United
Kingdom government to develop an aero engine which entered
military service in 1914.

For the anniversary event, the club plans to run SSB and PSK
31 on 160 through 10 meters plus FM and SSB locally on the 2
meter band using four separate stations.  Further details
are at www.hrrarc.com  (M0NJJ)

**

DX

In DX, JA0JHQ will be on the air as AH0CO from Saipan Island
through September 16th.  Activity will be on 80 through 10
meters.   QSL via JA0JHQ, direct or via the JARL Bureau.

PY2WAS will be operating as C6AAS from Cable Beach in the
Bahamas from October 4th to the 8th.  This will be a holiday
style operation concentrating nighttime on 30 through 10
meters using CW and SSB.  QSL via PY2WAS either direct or
via the bureau.

DJ7RJ and DJ2CW will be operating stroke as FR from Reunion
Island starting September 30th.  Activity will be on 160
through 10 meters using CW and SSB with one operator there
only through October 8th and the other remaining on the
island through the 30th.  QSL via each operator's home
callsign.

HB9LCA will be active as S79LCA from the Seychelles through
September through 27th.  Operations will be on 40 through 6
meters using mostly CW with some SSB.  QSL via his home
callsign, direct or by the bureau.

Lastly, four operators will take to the airwaves from The
Gambia using the call C5X from January 15th to the 26th of
2015. Activity will be on 160 through10 meters using CW,
SSB, RTTY and some PSK.  Logs will be uploaded daily to
ClubLog and Logbook of the World.  The QSL manager is for
this operation will be M0OXO.

(This weeks DX news courtesy of the Ohio-Penn DX Newsletter)

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  90TH ANNIVERSARY OF FOR FIRST NZ TO UK
CONTACT

And finally this week, the New Zealand Amateur Radio
Transmitters which is that nations national society has
issued an update on preparations to celebrate the 90th
anniversary of the first two-way radio communication between
that nation and the United Kingdom.  Amateur Radio
Newslines's Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF, reports from down-under:

--

On October 18, 1924, Frank Bell, 4AA, in Shag Valley, South
Island, NZ contacted Cecil Goyder, who was operating as 2SZ
from the Mill Hill school station in the United Kingdom.

New Zealand's Otago Branch 30 of the NZART is
celebrating the 90th anniversary of this radio contact that
changed radio communication forever as it established new
and initially the then little understood rules of short wave
communication.

In preparation for the celebration, working partys are being
held to test the antenna while quite a bit of effort is
going on arranging and sourcing equipment.  So far, two
visits have been made to Johnny Bell and his family who are
the 6th generation of the Bell family at the Shag Valley
Station location.

The attempt to recreate the contact will take place on
Saturday October 18th at around 06:30 UTC or 19:30 New
Zealand Daylight time which is the actual time of the
original contact.  This attempt will take place on 80 meters
which is as close to the original frequency as possible.
Later operations will include 40, 20, 17, 15 and 10 meters.
IRLP node 6507 will be on the club's 690 VHF repeater as
well.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF, in
Nelson, New Zealand.

--

According to the latest update anybody is welcome to come
and visit the station or assist with operating it at any
time during the week long celebration.  If you plan to do so
just drop an e-mail to president (at) ZL4AA.org.nz so that
they will know that you plan to attend.  More is on-line at
www.ZL4AA.org.nz and clicking the "90th Anniversary" tab.
(NZART)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, CQ Magazine, the
FCC, the Ohio Penn DX Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain, the
RSGB, the South African Radio League, the Southgate News,
TwiT-TV, Australia's WIA News and you our listeners, that's
all from the Amateur Radio NewslineT.  Our e-mail address is
newsline (at) arnewsline (dot) org. More information is
available at Amateur Radio Newsline'sT only official website
located at www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or
support us at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue,
Santa Clarita California, 91350.

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Don Wilbanks, AE5DW in Southern Mississippi, saying 73
and we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline™ is Copyright 2014.  All rights
reserved.

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