Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1905 - February 14, 2014

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Amateur Radio Newsline™ report number 1905 with a release
date of February, 14 2014 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a Q-S-T.  Hams stand ready in Slovenia as
severe weather turns electric power off for many citizens;
Radio Amateurs of Canada says it will protect hams from
proposed cellphone tower law; a United Kingdom monitoring
station traces 40 meter interference to France; an on the
air party to introduce High Frequency Digital Audio to the
world; the commissioning of the new Ham Video system on the
ISS postponed to March and twinkling the light of Morse code
are alive once more from the UK.  Find out the details are
on Amateur Radio NewslineT report number 1905 coming your
way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RADIO HAMS RESPONDING TO SLOVENIA ELECTRICITY DISRUPTION

The cold weather across Europe has disrupted the electricity
supply in Slovenia and radio amateurs have been assisting
with operations on a local level.  Amateur Radio Newsline's
Heather Embee, KB3TZD, has the details:

--

Since January 31st Slovenia has been affected by extreme
cold weather such as blizzards, heavy snow and sleet. This
has caused the collapse of power lines under the weight of
ice and falling trees with electricity disruptions now
affecting 250,000 people at the height of the outage.  The
restoration of electric mains supply was being made
difficult by the continuing bad weather.  This has prompted
Slovenia to request assistance from the European Union in
the form of mobile high power electric power generators.

While there has been no wide-spread national request for
communications assistance Slovenian radio amateurs are
preparing to respond if required.  In the meantime a number
of radio amateurs have been assisting in communications
operations on a local community level.  This, due to
problems with the mobile phone service and other radio
networks falling victim to the severe weather outbreak.

The European Union Civil Protection Mechanism has asked for
assistance from nearby European states with Germany, the
Czech Republic and Austria providing assistance.  Because of
uncertainty of both weather conditions and overall
communications, the Austrian teams responding to Slovenia
will be carrying their own gear so as to communicate back to
their home bases using Pactor and Winlink..

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, KB3TZD,
reporting.

--

OE1VGC is the Emergency Communications Coordinator for
Austria.  He is asking all European radio amateurs to keep
clear of 3.601, 3.608 and 3.617 MHz 3.644 MHz which are
being used to support the Pactor and Winlink operations
until further notice.  Information on the European Union
response can be found at: http://europa.eu/rapid/press-
release_IP-14-102_en.htm  (IARU Region 1)

**

RADIO LAW:  RAC SAYS IT WILL ACT TO PROTECT HAMS IN PROPOSED
NEW CELL TOWER LAW

Some possible new worries for our friends to the North
regarding towers and antennas.  This with the February 5th
announcement by Industry Canada's Minister of a new rule
making procedure titled "Harper Government Making Changes to
Cell Tower Placement Rules."  And while not directly
mentioned in the proposal, Canadian ham radio leaders appear
to fear that changes could adversely affect that nations
amateur radio community.

According to a news release from Radio Amateurs of Canada,
it does not believe this policy change announcement was
generated by problems caused by the amateur radio community.
It also says that the current 50 foot height limit has
worked well for several years.

Radio Amateurs of Canada goes on to say that amateur radio
antenna structures are more like those used to receive off
the air television or listen to short wave broadcasts and as
such they are different in many ways from cell phone towers.
It adds that it plans to convey to Industry Canada in the
strongest of terms that no changes should be made that would
negatively affect amateur radio antenna installations.
(RAC, VE3XRA)

**

WORLDBEAT:  UK MONITORING STATION TRACES 40 METER
INTERFERENCE TO FRANCE

A United Kingdom monitoring station has gotten a fix on a
possible French military station that has been causing
interference on 7.166  MHz in the 40 meter band.  The IARU
Monitoring System newsletter reports a French station has
been making long CW transmissions of 5 letter groups on
7.166 MHz.  United Kingdom telecommunications regulator
Ofcom's used its direction finding facility at Baldock to
get a fix on the station which is now believed to be located
in France's Loire valley.  (IARU-R1)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  POLAND GIVES HAMS TWO NEW BANDS

As of February 18th, two new bands have been made available
to ham radio operators in Poland.  The first is 472 to 479
kHz with up to 1 Watt of  Effective Radiated Power.  The
other spectrum is from 122.25 to 123.00 Gigahertz.  Both are
allocated to the Polish amateur service on a secondary non
interfering basis to other services using the same spectrum.
(Southgate, others)

**

WORLDBEAT:  ALL SOUTH AFRICA LICENSE RENEWALS DUE FEBRUARY
28

South African Telecommunications Regulator ICASA has
announced that the closing date for that nations radio
amateurs to file their license renewal will be February
28th.  This applies to all amateur radio licenses including
repeaters and beacons.  Failing to do so will result in
cancellation of the license.  According to the South African
Radio League, this is also an opportunity to renew an
amateur license for 5 years at a discounted rate.  (SARL)

**

ON THE AIR:  URAO PARTY TO INTRODUCE DIGITAL VOICE TO THE HF
WORLD

The European Radio Amateurs' Organization has announced a
new High Frequency on the air gathering that it's calling
"Experiencing Digital Voice."  Its purpose is to help
introduce this new mode to a wide as possible ham radio
audience while having fun and meeting other hams on the air
the world over.

The event is slated March 1st and 2nd from 00:00 to 24:00
hours UTC each day.  The mode used will be Free D V which
implements both Codec 2 and the FDMDV modem neither of which
is patent protected or restricted.

This is not a contest but rather just a radio meeting but it
does have a few simple recommendations to follow.
Recommended frequencies for this fun technology gathering
and all other needed information is on the web at
www.eurao.org.  It's the second item down on the page.
(EURAO)

**

GOING TO SPACE:  SEND YOUR NAME TO THE ASTEROID BENNU

If you have ever wanted to vicariously into space, now is
your chance.  NASA is inviting people around the world
including ham radio operators  to submit their names to be
etched on a microchip aboard a spacecraft headed to the
asteroid Bennu in 2016.

The "Messages to Bennu" microchip will travel to the
asteroid aboard the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource
Identification Security Regolith Explorer spacecraft. The
robotic mission will spend more than two years at the
asteroid, which has a width of only about 1,760 feet.  The
spacecraft will collect a sample of Bennu's surface and then
return it to Earth .

The deadline to submit your name online is Sept. 30, 2014.
Participants who submit their names to the "Messages to
Bennu" campaign will be able to print a certificate of
appreciation to document their involvement.  To submit your
name for inclusion on this mission please take your web
browser to planetary.org/bennu.  While there are no
instructions as to how to how to include your callsign, we
found it simple to just put it right after your last name.
(ANS, NASA)

**

DX UP FRONT:  PERUVIAN IOTA DXPEDITION

In DX up front, word that a joint Peruvian expedition
composed of members of the Radio Club Peruano and the Radio
Club Grupo DX Bahia Blanca of Argentina, will be on the air
from Isla San Lorenzo from February 20th to the 24th.  The
Island is located in the Pacific with the group signing the
special call OC0I. The operators plan to have two stations
active simultaneously 24 hours a day on 80 through 10
meters, including WARC bands.  Modes mentioned include CW,
SSB and PSK-31.  QSL direct to LU7DSY or via the bureau to
LU3DXG.  Electronic QSL's go via  eQSL.  (Southgate)

**

DX UP FRONT:  OH2AXE MOVES TO CRETE

And word from OH2AXE that he is now a permanent resident on
Crete and on the air signing portable SV9. He hopes to
obtain a SV0 callsign eventually.  For the moment please QSL
direct only or electronically using eQSL.  We will have more
DX news for you later on in this weeks newscast.  (DXNL)

**

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station.  We are the Amateur
Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the VU3MGH repeater serving Madurai in the South
of India.

(5 sec pause here)


**

COMMUNICATIONS POLITICS:  SENATE NOTE LIKELY TO TAKE UP
REVISING THE COMMUNICATIONS ACT SOON

Don't look for the United States Senate to follow the House
of Representatives lead to overhaul the Communications Act
anytime soon as we hear from Amateur Radio Newsline's Bill
Pasternak, WA6ITF:

--

According to United States Senator Mark Pryor of Tennessee,
the Senate won't be following the House's lead this year to
overhaul the sweeping law regulating TV, radio and all other
telecommunications services.

The Communications Act, first written in 1934, created the
Federal Communications Commission and outlined rules
governing communications as it stood at that time.  Over the
years it has been amended on many occasions to try to keep
up with emerging technologies.  The Act was last updated in
1996, when the Internet was still in its infancy.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee has already begun to
look into ways to bring the Communications Act into line
with the needs of the 21st Century, but Pryor who is
chairman of the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on
Communications said the overall Senate Commerce Committee
probably will not be following suit.

Critics of the current Communications Act have said that it
creates what they call silos for different type of
communications.  That they say has posed a problem for new
technologies such as Voice over Internet Proytocol phone
calls that are transmitted over broadband and other Internet
lines.

The House of Representatives effort to rewrite the law is
expected to take multiple years, and has only just gotten
started.  This past January an Energy and Commerce
Subcommittee held its first hearing on the issue with five
former FCC chairmen in attendance.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
in the Newsroom in Los Angeles.

--

So when might the Senate take on looking at such a
Communications Act overhaul?  Most political guessers think
that it will be sometime after the mid-term elections at the
earliest.  (The Hill, CommNews)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  FCC AFFIRMS $10000 FINE AGAINST UNLICENSED SAN
FRANCISCO STATION

The FCC has denied a petition for reconsideration and has
ordered Daniel K. Roberts of San Francisco, California, to
pay a $10,000 fine for operating an unlicensed radio
station.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Norm Seeley, KI7UP,
reports:

--

According to the FCC, the case concerns Daniel Roberts's
alleged operation of a station it identifies as Pirate Cat
Radio.  This claims the agency was an unlicensed radio
broadcast station operating on 87.9 MHz in San Francisco,
California.

As detailed in the Forfeiture Order, Daniel Roberts was
identified as the executive of the Pirate Cat Cafe and
Studio.  The FCC asserts that in 2008, Roberts began
operating Pirate Cat Radio from a studio at the same
location.  At the time the Notice of Apparent Liability for
Forfeiture was issued, the Pirate Cat Radio website
prominently featured Roberts while describing itself as an
unlicensed low powered community radio station.

On October 23, 2009, Roberts filed a response to the Notice.
In it he acknowledged his previous involvement in extra-
legal broadcasting years ago, but denied that transmissions
had ever emanated from the Pirate Cat Radio Cafe and Studio.
Roberts also denied operating or controlling any unlicensed
radio station on 87.9 MHz or any transmission of energy on
any frequency.  Roberts claimed that the Pirate Cat Cafe and
Studio internet streamed program was likely downloaded and
broadcast by third parties.

But in its February 7th finding denying the FCC said that
based on the overall record in this case, it finds that the
agency correctly determined that Roberts was engaged in the
management and operation of Pirate Cat Radio.  This in
violation of Section 301 of the Act and that proof of the
operation was supported by a preponderance of evidence.  It
then affirmed the Forfeiture Order gave him the usual time
to pay or to file a further appeal.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Norm Seeley, KI7UP, in
Scottsdale, Arizona.

--

If Roberts fails pay the fine the FCC says the matter could
be turned over to the Department of Justice for possible
further action.  (FCC)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  NEW ZEALAND SAYS NO TO STREAMING AIR TRAFFIC
OVER THE WWW

New Zealand's Radio Spectrum Management says that streaming
air traffic communications over the internet may compromise
air safety.  It has already ordered one such operation to
cease as we hear from Amateur Radio Newsline's Jim Meachen,
ZL2BHF:

--

A commercial pilot recently began streaming local airport
radio communications traffic over the internet, without
either the consent of the parties involved or of the Civil
Aviation Authority.

Telecommunications regulator Radio Spectrum Management soon
received a complaint from the airport.  It was concerned of
a likely compromise to the safety and integrity of its
operations resulting from unwanted publication of its
communications.

In consultation with the Civil Aviation Authority which was
also concerned that the internet streaming breached
International Civil Aviation Organization principles, and
with assistance of airport staff, Radio Spectrum Management
was able to quickly locate the offender and visited the
property. The pilot cooperated with an inspection and was
then formally warned.

It should be noted that Articles 17 and 18 of the
International Telecommunication Union Radio Regulations
apply to secrecy of communications by both licensees and the
general public.  New Zealand gives recognition to those
requirements in the nations Radiocommunications Act 1989.
Those laws make it an offense for anyone to disclose the
contents, or to reproduce, or to make use of radio based
communications not intended for that person.  The Act also
provides for a penalty of up to $30,000 in New Zealand
Dollars for violating this law.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF, in
Nelson, New Zealand.

--

As we go to air there is no word as to what if any
additional penalties the unnamed pilot may face for
violating New Zealand laws against streaming airport audio
over the Internet.

(NZ Radio Spectrum Management)

**

RADIO ON-LINE:  APPS FOR HAMS AND SWLS AT SWLING POST

Hams looking for amateur radio related apps for their smart
phones or tablets now have a place to go to learn what's
available.  The on-line SWLing Post has printed a run down
of some of the amateur radio apps that are currently
available.  Apps for Shortwave Listeners are there as well.
To get there, simply go to tinyurl.com/ham-radio-apps

(SWLing Post, Southgate)

**

HAM HAPPENING:  CENTRAL STATES VHF SOCIETY SOLICITING PAPERS
FOR CONFERENCE

The Central States VHF Society is soliciting papers and
presentations for the 48th annual conference slated for July
25th to the 27th in Austin, Texas.

Papers and presentations pertaining to all aspects of
operation on VHF and above frequencies other than FM and
repeaters are welcome.  The due date for all entries is
April 23rd with all submission going via e-mail to Tom Apel
or Dick Hanson via e-mail to tom at k5tra dot net or dick at
dkhanson dot com.

This years featured dinner speaker will be Jimmy Treybig,
W6JKV.  And possibly as an added incentive, planners say
that there will be Best Presentation and Best Technical
Paper awards presented at this year's convention banquet.
More is on the web at csvhfs.org.  (VHF Reflector)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  2014 FIELD DAY PACKETS AVAILABLE.

The ARRL has announced that the 2014 Field Day packets are
now available on-line at arrl.org/field-day.  This years
Field Day takes place on June 28 and 29th.  (ARRL)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  N8TMW NASHVILLE SCENE TO AIR FEB 26

An episode of the TV program Nashville on which Amateur
Radio Newsline's Jim Damron, N8TMW, will appear is now
slated for broadcast on Wednesday evening, February 26th on
the ABC Television Network.  As previously reported Jim
plays the part of a minister conducting the graveside
service of one of the show's characters.  He says that the
scene was shot in the historic Mt Olivet Cemetery in
Nashville.  The title of the episode is number 215 and
carries the title of "They Don't Make 'em Like My Daddy
Anymore."  (N8TMW)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  We are
the Amateur Radio Newsline with links to the world from our
only official website at www.arnewsline.org and being
relayed by the volunteer services of the following radio
amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY:  JAPAN TO TEST 'MAGNETIC NET' TO CATCH
FLOATING SPACE JUNK

One of the real challenges to low Earth orbit satellite
deployment is the growing amount of space junk circling the
globe.  Now Japan thinks it has found a way to can get rid
of some of that debris as we hear from Skeeter Nash, N5ASH:

--

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency has teamed up with a
company that manufactures fishing equipment to create an
orbital space net that will sweep the skies above our planet
for man made debris.  The first test of the equipment is
scheduled for later this month when a satellite developed by
researchers at Kagawa University is launched.  Once on
orbit, the bird will deploy a 1000 feet long wire net with
the ability to generate a magnetic field.  Theoretically
this should attract some of the debris that is circulating
beyond our atmosphere.

The majority of the debris is in a band between 400 to 700
miles above the surface of the planet consisting of parts of
obsolete satellites and rockets.  Experts estimate that 100
million bits of this man made junk in orbit around the
Earth.  Of that total, some 22,000 pieces are believed to
measure 10 cm or larger and are therefore considered
dangerous if one collides with a functioning satellite or
the International Space Station.

Im Skeeter Nash, N5ASH.

--

While it may sound a bit like science fiction, the same was
said about mans exploration of the moon and beyond less than
five decades ago.  More is on the web at
http://tinyurl.com/kjanbpx (Southgate, G7VFY)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  HAM VIDEO COMMISSIONING POSTPONED

The European Space Agency has postponed the commissioning of
the new Ham Video system until at least March 8th.
According to Gaston Bertels, ON4WF, this is a multi-step
process with the possible dates being March 8th for step 1,
March 9th for step 2 and March 16th for step 3.  These dates
are all on weekends.  While the agenda is still to be
finalized Bertels notes that there will be a week of blank
transmissions as a part of the commissioning process.  Once
in operation the Ham Video system will expand the experience
of those participating in the Ham Radio in Space classroom
contacts.  (ON4WF)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  VON KARMAN INSTITUTE QB50 PRECURSOR
FLIGHTS TO CARRY HAM TRANSPONDERS

The Von Karman Institute of Belgium is developing a
constellation of 50 CubeSats called QB 50 that will be
launched into a 220 mile altitude low earth orbit for
scientific research.

Now comes word that AMSAT-UK, AMSAT-Francophone, and AMSAT-
NL are preparing amateur radio payloads to fly on two
precursor spacecraft to launch in advance of the main
satellites.  These early birds are expected to be carried to
space in April or May of this year and placed into a 370
mile high Sun Synchronous orbit.  One bird will carry a
FUNcube-based UHF to VHF linear transponder and the other
will be a UHF to VHF FM transponder with AX25 telemetry.
Exact operating frequencies and other technical details of
these two tiny satellites has not been announced.

The precise launch date of the 50 microsat QB 50
constellation has yet to be confirmed but the launch window
is defined as being between December 2015 and November 2016.

(AMSAT-UK)

**

RADIO IN SPACE:  CUBESATS DEPLOYED FROM INTERNATIONAL SPACE
STATION

Astronaut Koichi Wakata, KC5ZTA, has successfully deployed
the first of the 33 CubeSats that were launched to the
International Space Station in the Cygnus freighter on
January 9th.  The Tuesday, February 11th deployment
consisted of the first two of the Flock-1 constellation of
28 Dove CubeSats made by Planet Labs.

In addition to the 28 Planet Labs micro-birds, there are
also four amateur radio CubeSats waiting to be placed on-
orbit.  These are LituanicaSat-1, LitSat-1, ArduSat-2 and
UAPSat-1 as well as a 915 MHz CubeSat SkyCube.  All are
planned to be deployed in the coming weeks.  (ANS)

**

ON THE AIR:  CELEBRATING THE HAMANAKO FLOWER EXPO

On the air, keep an ear open for special event station
8N2HHH to be active on all bands and modes between March 1st
to June 16th.  This in celebration of Japan's Hamanako
Flower Expo in Shizuoka.  Shizuoka-city is located in
Shizuoka prefecture on the island of Honshu.  If you make
contact, please QSL as directed on the air.  (JJ1WTL/AC6IM)

**

ON THE AIR:  ROTARIANS ON THE AIR TO STOP POLIO

To celebrate the birthday of community service organization
Rotary International and highlight its involvement in
eradicating the disease polio, members of the organization
will be  on air on February the 22nd and 23rd with a number
of special event stations.

All participating Rotarians on Amateur Radio throughout the
world will call CQ Polio to commemorate the founding of
Rotary International in 1905, and educate the public about
Rotary's End Polio Now campaign.

Thanks to the vaccine developed by the late researcher Dr.
Jonas Salk. Polio is no longer a problem in many nations.
However it still remains a major threat to public health in
a number of places around the globe.  (WAI News)

**

DX

In DX, UA4WHX is now active stroke CE0Z from Robinson Crusoe
Island.  As always, the length of his stay is unknown but he
has been heard in the past on 80 through 10 meters using CW,
SSB and RTTY.   QSL via the information found on QRZ.com.

OE4AAC is reportedly on the air stroke 3B9 from Rodrigues
Island and will be there  through February 18th.  Activity
is holiday style on 40 through 10 meters using CW only.  QSL
via OE4AAC.

F5MVB and F5AOW are planning to be active as 5V7MP and
5V7BJ, respectively, from Avepozo, Togo from March 23rd to
the 31st.  Operations will be on CW and SSB.  QSL via their
home callsigns, either direct or by the Bureau.

G3XAQ be on the air from Kampala, Uganda, as 5X1XA between
February 25th and March 16th.  Activity will be CW only.
QSL 5X1XA via G3SWH.

GM4YXI and GM3WOJ will be operational as A35X and A35V
respectively, from Tongatapu Island between April 4th to the
18th. Activity will be on 160 through 10 meters using CW and
SSB and some RTTY.  QSL both A35V and A35X via N3SL

Lastly, M5RIC will be active stroke 5B from Cyprus between
July 22nd and the 29th.  His operation will include the RSGB
Islands on the Air Contest slated for July 26th and the 27th
using the callsign C4I.  Outside of the contest, look for
him on SSB and RTTY.  QSL via M0OXO.

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  WORLDBEAT:  UK BRISTOL'S CABOT TOWER SENDS
OUT MORSE CODE AGAIN

A visual beacon is once again shining from a special place
in the United Kingdom and is speaking in Morse code.
Amateur Radio Newsline's Cheryl Lasek, K9BIK, tells us the
story:

--

A blinking lamp spelling out the name Bristol in Morse code
is flashing once again from the United Kingdom's 105 foot
tall Cabot Tower.  This, marking the full refurbishment of
the historic monument.

The sites old Morse transmitter was switched off in 2001
after developing a major problem that required major repair.
It was removed when the tower was closed to the public six
years later following the discovery of cracks in its
structure.

The tower was reopened in 2011 following a massive
restoration.  The finishing touch will be added when the
transmitter is reinstalled but is currently just sending the
name Bristol once again.

Originally it flashed out the word `Bristol' from dusk until
dawn.  The text was later changed to read Cabot Tower,
Brandon Hill, Bristol.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Cheryl Lasek, K9BIK, in
Zion Illinois.

--

More about the history of the Cabot Tower can be found at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabot_Tower_(St._John's)
(Southgate, Wikipedia, Various)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC
Communicator, CQ Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX
Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain, the RSGB, the Southgate
News, TWiT-TV and Australia's WIA News, that's all from the
Amateur Radio NewslineT.  Our e-mail address is newsline
(at) arnewsline (dot) org.  More information is available at
Amateur Radio Newsline'sT only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org.  You can also write to us or support us
at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa
Clarita California, 91350

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Hal Rogers, K8CMD, saying 73 and we thank you for
listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline™ is Copyright 2014.  All rights
reserved.

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