Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1943 - November 7 2014

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Amateur Radio Newsline™ report number 1943 with a release
date of November 7th 2014 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a Q-S-T.  China's Moon fly-by and return to
earth mission is a success, but where is the 4 M ham radio
payload?  Also, the latest on sunspot activity; Australian
hams to keep access to the 3.5 Gigahertz band; Enhanced
Loran comes to United Kingdom shipping ports; ARISS U.S.
partners now accepting proposals for school contacts in 2015
and the BBC announces it Genome Project for cataloging its
past.  Find out the details are on Amateur Radio Newsline
report number 1942 coming your way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  4M MOON FLY-BY MISSION HAS COME TO AN
END

The epic voyage of the 4M ham radio Lunar fly-by mission has
come to an end as we hear from from Amateur Radio Newslines
Heather Embee, KB3TZD:

--

The Lux Space Manfred Memorial Moon Mission, nicknamed 4M
that circled the Moon on October 28th is now in Earth orbit.
At least it was as of November 3rd as reported in a post to
the Lux Space mission blog.

From the information available as we go to air, the 4 M
Amateur Radio payload was attached to the upper stage of a
Chinese Long March 3C rocket.  Its primary payload was the
Chang'e 5-T1 which is a prototype of a Mars lander capsule
with the ability to safely return to Earth.   Both completed
the loop around the moon early on October 28th and headed
back toward our home planet.  As widely reported the Chang'e
5-T1 made it safely through the Earth's atmosphere without
any real heat damage.  It touched down at 22:42 UTC on
October 31 in Inner Mongolia.

But before that, it appears that the 4 M payload was
separated from the Long March and injected into an
elliptical Earth orbit averaging around 24,800 miles with a
inclination of 50 degrees.  It reached perigee early Sunday
morning November 2nd with good JT65 digital signals heard
over Europe on 145.980 MHz.  At that time, Lux Space
estimated that the 4M payload had enough power left for
another 2 to 3 days of operation.  Also noted was that the
Dosimeter experiment called DRALUX had stopped functioning.

Exactly whats next for the 4M payload can only bee
speculated.  Being self contained with no solar charging
ability it wills more than likely go QRT if that has not
taken place by now.  If you happen to locate its signal, Lux
Space would appreciate getting activity reports.  They go
via the mission client program that can be downloaded at
tinyurl.com/4M-online-report

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, KB3TZD,
in Berwick, Pennsylvania.

--

While there is likely a lot more to this story, there is no
doubt that the 4 M amateur radio Lunar fly-by will go into
the history books as a first for ham radio in space.  (Lux
Space Blog, published news reports)

**

PROPAGATION:  NASA RELEASES VIDEO OF SOLAR FLARES FIRING
FROM MONSTER SUNSPOT

NASA has released a video showing eight days of solar flares
produced by the largest sunspot in the past two dozen years.
Known as AR 2192, the video is a time lapse that shows its X-
class flares in both visible and ultraviolet light using
images taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric
Imaging Assembly Instrument.  As previously reported here on
Amateur Radio Newsline, the massive sunspot, which has now
rotated away from Earth, produced of the most powerful X-
class flares between October 19th and the 27th, plus many
more medium-class flares during that same period.  The video
is on-line several places including YoyuTube at
tinyurl.com/sunspot-AR2192.  Another version with graphics
and a musical background is at tinyurl.com/sunspot-ar2192-
video  (spacereporter.com)

**

PROPAGATION:  NEW SUNSPOT AR2205 ROTATING TOWARD EARTH

Meantime, a new sunspot region, designated AR 2205, has
already produced four medium M-class flares and is rotating
in Earth's direction.    AR 2205 unleashed the flares
including one rated M6.  That flare was recorded by NASA's
Solar Dynamics Observatory on November 3rd at 22:40 UTC.
Sunspot AR 2205 has also produced several Coronal Mass
Ejections though these did not head toward our planet.
Observers at the Space Weather Prediction Center are
monitoring it carefully.  For the latest updates take your
web browser to spaceweather.com.  (space.com,
spaceweather.com)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  AUSTRALIA TO KEEP 3.5 GHZ HAM RADIO STATUS
QUO

Radio amateurs down-under engaged in microwave work can
breathe a sigh of relief.  This as the Australian
Communications and Media Authority or ACMA decides to retain
the existing mix of spectrum licensing arrangements in the
3.5 GHz band.

Earlier this year the Australian Minister for
Communications, Malcolm Turnbull issued a draft direction to
the telecommunications regulator to enable licensing of 3.5
GHz to the National Broadband Network or NBN in major
mainland cities.

The draft direction document specified that the ACMA look at
a 25 MHz block at 3400 to 3425 MHz and a 50 MHz block at
3492.5 to 3542.5 MHz.  The 3.5 GHz spectrum band was
identified for possible reallocation so the NBN had a
'spectrum gap' to fill in the outskirts of metropolitan
areas affecting 80,000 homes and businesses.

But in issuing its decision the telecommunications regulator
stated that after taking into account the commentary
submissions received and developments that have occurred
since then, the ACMA has decided to maintain existing
licensing arrangements in the band.  That means the
retention of Amateur Radio as a secondary user of the band.
The issue attracted 24 submissions.  (VK3PC)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  BRAZIL TO EXTEND FM BROADCAST BAND DOWNWARD
TO 76 MHZ

The FM Radio Data System website reports that some countries
appear to be planning to extend the FM broadcast band
downward.  According to a web post, Brazilian
telecommunications regulator ANATEL was contacted and it
confirmed the planned extension of the FM band down to 76
MHz.  It was noted that there will be a problem with the
Radio Data System operating in the range 76 to 87.5 MHz
however with implementation of RDS2.0 this could likely be
solved.  The entire story is on-line at tinyurl.com/brazil-
band-extension.  The same website also notes that China
plans to extend broadcast FM radio down to 64 MHz.
(Southgate)

**

DX UP-FRONT:  PANGOR ISLAND NOVEMBER 8 - 9

In DX up-front late word that the 9M2SE Pangor Island
operation is likely taking place as some of you hear this
newscast.  The latest word is that this Island Islands On
The Air operation was slated to begin at Zero Hundred hours
UTC on November 8th and end precisely 24 hours later on
November 9th.  The group has also announced that Pangor will
be its last DXpedition and Islands on the Air activation.
After it concludes the organization will be dissolved.  QSL
via the 9M2SE information on QRZ.com.  (9M2SE Team)

**

DX UP FRONT:  BOUVET ISLAND - JANUARY to APRIL 2016

ON4WW reports that he has been granted permission by the
Norwegian Polar Institute to land and live on Bouvet Island
during the mid-January until mid-April of 2016.  The sole
purpose of this operation will be to provide contacts with
Bouvet which is currently ranked number three on the various
DXCC Most Wanted Lists.  During his time on Bouvet, ON4WW
hopes to make at least 100,000 QSO's using CW, SSB and RTTY
on all of the High Frequency bands.  There is however one
caveat: Whether or not this DXpedition will take place
depends on raising the necessary funding.  More is on the
web at www.on4ww.be/bouvet2016.html  (OPDX)

**

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station.  We are the Amateur
Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the WB5RAP repeater serving Purcell, Oklahoma.

(5 sec pause here)


**

RESCUE RADIO:  UK TO USE WW2 TECHNOLOGY TO BACK UP GPS IN
THE UK

Technology developed during World War Two is to be used as a
back-up for GPS.  This after the United Kingdom's General
Lighthouse Authorities announces that it has installed a
system called enhanced or e Loran in seven ports across
Britain.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Don Wilbanks, AE5DW,
reports:

--

The United Kingdom's General Lighthouse Authorities says
that many critical instruments on ships use Global
Navigation Satellite Systems also known by the acronym GPS.
It says that if GPS were to fail the consequences could be
disastrous.  But says the General Lighthouse Authorities,
the new system, which uses proven technology dating back to
the 1940's is ground rather than satellite-based and is
designed to be used in the event of a GPS failure.

Testing for eLoran has taken place in Felixstowe which is
the busiest container port in the UK.  Each year some three
million cargo containers are brought into this port on some
of the biggest ships in the world.

According to Wikipedia, LORAN is an acronym for
Long Range Navigation.  The system was developed in
the United States during World War II and was similar to the
UK's GEE system but operated at lower frequencies in order
to provide improved range up to 1,500 miles.

As an aside, it's a pity this story didn't get released just
before June 6th this year, the 70th anniversary of the D-Day
landings on the northern France coast. The original system
was used to assist the mine clearance operations in the
English Channel so that the invading fleet could reach the
shore with the minimum of casualties.  A `Ghost' slave
station was also put into operation at the same time to make
the Germans think that the real invasion was to be at the
Pas de Calais and the Straits of Dover and that the Normandy
landings were purely a diversionary tactic.  How wrong they
were..!

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks, AE5DW, in
New Orleans.

--

An in-depth look at the return of this 20th century
navigation system here in the 21st century can be found at
tinyurl.com/e-loran-return.  A full explanation of the
development, implementation and demise of the original
system is at wikipedia.org/wiki/LORAN  (G7VFY, G8AUU,
Southgate, BBC, Wikipedia)

**

RESCUE RADIO:  HAM RADIO ASSISTS IN AT SEA RESCUE

When the sailing ship Hale Revenge ran into trouble in the
Pacific it turned to ham radio as we hear in this report:

--

Larry Lecrone (WW6USA) called to report that he was
monitoring one of the ham radio emergency projects known as
the Maritme Net which is continually monitored by a series
of volunteer radio operators across the country.

While monitoring that net on Sunday night he served as back-
up when another amateur radio operator on board a sailing
vessel adrift in the Pacific was taking on water in nearly
60-foot seas nearly 800 miles west of the California-Oregon
border.  That vessel wanted to declare an emergency but was
having trouble contacting the Coast Guard.  The ham that
took the call notified the Coast Guard ans served as a relay
between them and the distressed vessel.

The Coast Guard sent out an HT-130 aircraft from the Point
Reyes Coast Guard Air Station in California.  The ham
Maritime Net operator instructed the sailboat to activate
their Emergency Locator Beacon.

A container cargo ship; the 965 foot the Hyundai Grace was
in the region and responded to that beacon signal and
rescued all on board that sailboat which was on its way from
Honolulu to Everett, Washington, when it was damaged by high
winds and seas.

Ken Bass, KALH Spectrum News from Alamagordo, New Mexico,
reporting.

--

The ham radio gear on board the 32 foot vessel that was an
ICOM IC-718 transceiver.   Nathan Stickel, NH7FS, is
reported to have been the ham radio operator on the voyage.

(WW7USA with audio report provided by Ken Bass of KALH
Spectrum News)

**

RESCUE RADIO: OKLAHOMA HAMS GET TRAINING IN AUXILLIARY
COMMUNICATIONS

About 23 hams from the state of Oklahoma attended a special
Auxiliary Communications Class held the weekend of November
1st and 2nd in the city of Altus.  According to Lloyd
Colston, KC5FM, who is Altus Emergency Management Director,
the attendees represented faith based groups, Community
Emergency Response Teams, the American Radio Relay League,
the Military Auxiliary Radio System, and local government.

Colston says that the class covered numerous topics
including how to use volunteers and how amateur radio
operators are technical specialists to mention only two.
Instructors were amateur radio operators with one being a
member of the Military Auxiliary Radio System as well as a
division director for the American Radio Relay League.
KC5FM  added that the class also received Homeland Security
training.  (KC5FM)

**

RESCUE RADIO: BROADCASTERS AND CABLE VS DISABILITY ADVOCATES
ON EAS TEXT

Trade groups have told the FCC that its proposed new
guidelines for the text that crawls at the top of the screen
during a flood, snowstorm or other emergency are not
necessary and could be expensive but disability advocacy
groups are not buying that position.  Amateur Radio
Newsline's Stephan Kinford, N8WB, takes a look at the issue:

--

The FCC is said to be working on new guidelines for the text
that runs during an emergency alert.  This, as part of
its broader overhaul of the emergency system that will
create a new location code for transmitting emergency
messages nationwide.

But says the National Cable and Telecommunications
Association the current cable systems generally display
visual crawls that are readable by viewers, that do not pass
too quickly, and continue throughout the duration of the
Emergency Alert Service activation. The NCTA added that
standardizing the appearance of Emergency Alert Service
messages for speed and size is unnecessary to address
accessibility concerns and would lead to significant cost
with little benefit.

On the other side of the argument a coalition of disability
advocacy organizations has strongly recommended a
standardized system of emergency messages.  One that
included slower text crawl speed and larger size
characters.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kinford, N8WB,
reporting.

--

At airtime it is not known if or when the FCC will take
action on this item.  (The Hill)

**

RADIO READING:  LATEST CQ-DATV MAGAZINE IS NOW AVAILABLE FOR
FREE DOWNLOAD

The November issue of the CQ-DATV e-magazine is now
available for free download.  The new issue contains the
latest amateur television news from around the world, an
editorial, Ian Abel, G3ZHI, that asks why ATV repeaters do
not have internet inputs, a simple microwave detector for 10
GHz by John Hudson G3RFL and much more.  Those interested
can find this issue and those of previous months at
tinyurl.com/datv-november-2014.   (CQ-DATV)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  KI4LA RECEIVES KENTUCKY HISTORICAL
SOCIETY AWARD

Some names in the news.  First up is former ARRL Great Lakes
Division Director Gary Johnston, KI4LA, who has been named
as the recipient of the Kentucky Historical Society's 2014
Award of Distinction.

KI4LA is president of the Board of Trustees of the Behringer-
Crawford Museum in Covington, Kentucky.  According to the
Cincinnati Enquirer newspaper, since joining the board of
trustees in 2003, Johnston has had a significant impact on
the museum and the communities it serves.

The article also notes that during thousands of volunteer
hours, he redesigned and upgraded the museum's computer
systems, chaired the committee that revamped its
organizational structure, and helped secure more than $2.3
million dollars in funding to complete the museum's major
expansion which opened in 2007.  (ARRL, Cincinnati Enquirer)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  M0PHI NEW CHAIR OF RSGB TRAINING AND
EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The Radio Society of Great Britain has announced the
appointment of Philip Willis, M0PHI as the new Chairman of
its Training and Education Committee.  Willis succeeds Steve
Hartley, G0FUW in this post.  (GB2RS)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS: K6LCS FREQUENCY CHARTS  GETTING READY FOR
FOX-1A

Clint Bradford, K6LCS, has updated his frequency programming
charts for the so-called easy-sats to include the upcoming
orbiting AMSAT-North America FOX-1A satellite.  The chart as
well as a copy of JoAnne Maenpaa K9JKM's article titled
"Getting Ready for FOX-1A" are both available for
downloading at work-sat.com/Sat_Skeds.html.  An easy sat is
basically defined as an easy to access and use ham radio
satellite requiring a minimum of equipment for the task.
(Southgate, Facebook)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  We are
the Amateur Radio Newsline with links to the world from our
only official website at www.arnewsline.org and being
relayed by the volunteer services of the following radio
amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

WORLDBEAT:  IARU REGION 1 ANNOUNCES YOUTH BUDGET FOR 2015 -
2017

Region one of the International Amateur Radio Union plans to
spend roughly $28,000 on young hams in 2015, 2016 and 2017.
According to the minutes of the recent 23rd IARU Region 1
General Conference for that time frame about $26,000 will be
spent directly on youth oriented projects with another $2000
on a new Youth Working Group that will be chaired by Lisa
Leenders, PA2LS.  This Youth Working Group will organize and
coordinate the Region One Youngsters On The Air program and
other Region One youth oriented activities.  (IARU R-1)

**

WORLDBEAT:  IRELANDS RTE LONGWAVE CLOSURE POSTPONED TO 2015

The imminent closure of the Irish public broadcaster RTE's
long wave service has been postponed until January 19, 2015.

Its original shut down date was this past October 27th but
the Managing Director of RTE Radio, Jim Jennings, announced
plans to travel to the United Kingdom to meet with community
groups affected by the loss of service.  Jennings hopes to
find other solutions might be found acceptable to them.

Long wave is the only RTE radio service that reaches the
United Kingdom using RF transmission though the global Irish
audience can also listen online.  The outcry over the
closure was greater than expected, but Jennings says the
long wave service is still set to be shuttered early next
year.  (Southgate, Radiosurvivor)

**

WORLDBEAT:  SHORTWAVE'S NEWEST BROADCASTER GLOBAL 24
RADIO NOW ON THE AIR

There is a new shortwave radio broadcaster coming your way
from here in the United States.  Global 24 Radio is an
English language, around-the-clock, fixed-frequency,
commercial shortwave radio broadcaster, transmitting via the
facilities WRMI in Okeechobee, Florida.  It began
broadcasting on Friday, October 31st at zero hundred hours
UTC on 9.395 MHz.  More information on the station and a
daily programming listing is at global24radio.com
(Global24)

**

WORLDBEAT:  CHELMSFORD CALLING TO BE BROADCAST ON SHORTWAVE

Jim Salmon, 2E0RMI, has announced that the program
Chelmsford Calling will also be relayed on shortwave by
Florida-based broadcaster WRMI.  Chelmsford Calling is
described as a light entertainment program produced by
Salmon from the Chelmsford Calling Network.  This
organization was established with the aim of promoting past,
present and future radio technology to its audience.  The
first shortwave relay will take place on Friday, November
14th at 2300 UTC.  More about the this show is at
chelmsfordcalling.com  (Chelmsford Calling, Southgate)

**

WORLDBEAT:  LOGGERS SUFFER LED LIGHTING INTERFERENCE

New Zealand telecommunications regulator Radio Spectrum
Management has identified serious cases of interference to
radio communications at log hauler sites from the operation
of vehicle mounted LED lighting.  The interference is so
severe that in hours of darkness where the lights are on
radio systems have become inoperable.

Due to serious safety concerns Radio Spectrum Management was
requested to investigate the situation.  It conducted an
audit of emergency lighting suppliers where it was generally
found that these companies were not aware of the need to
ensure their equipment met that nations necessary EMC
radiation standards.  (NZ RSM, Southgate)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  ARISS U.S. PARTNERS NOW ACCEPTING
PROPOSALS FOR CONTACTS IN 2015

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station or
ARISS Program is seeking formal and informal education
institutions and organizations, individually or working
together, to host an Amateur Radio contact with a crew
member on board the ISS.

ARISS anticipates that the contact would be held between May
1st and December 31st of 2015 but as always, crew scheduling
and the space stations orbits will determine the exact
contact dates.  Also, to maximize these radio contact
opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will
draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact
into a well-developed education plan.

ARISS contacts can be performed in one of two ways.  One is
s radio link between an amateur radio station set up in a
school talking directly to the amateur station on board the
ISS.  The other involve the use of a teleconference bridge
where a specific amateur radio ground station establishes
the radio link with the ISS. Voice communications between
students and the astronauts are then patched over regular
telephone lines.

The ariss.org website gives details.  On the home page,
right below the title is a menu line of choices.  Click on
"Submit a Contact Proposal" page.  The deadline to submit a
proposal is December 15th.  (K1STO. ARISS.org)

**

ON THE NET:  DX SUMMIT GETS A NEW LOOK

The popular DX Summit website operated by Radio Arcala
station OH8X is getting a new look and a new name.  As of
December 1st, the site will become My DX Summit will soon
have a fresh new face and a more modern user interface.
Among the changes will be real time posting of DX spotting
that is user selectable of precisely the kind of spots that
interest them.  Also, entering a spotting will be made
easier through a simple dialogue box.  Site developers also
note that a lot of effort is being put into having it work
with a majority of mobile devices and browsers.  It's
expected that the ongoing testing procedure could result in
some changes to the site before its actual rollout.  (RADIO
ARCALA)

**

RADIO RESEARCH:  NEW NORTHERN IRELAND 70 CM PROPAGATION
BEACON

GB3NGI which is the first of the United Kingdom's new 70
centimeter propagation beacons is now operational on
432.482MHz.  The system is located on a hilltop in Northern
Ireland and is licensed for 250 watts peak envelope power
output on a 125 degree bearing.  GB3NGI transmits both CW
and the JT65B digital mode.  Reception reports and a
coverage map are at www.beaconspot.eu.  (GB2RS)

**

ON THE AIR:  CELEBRATING THE TRANSATLANTIC SAILING RACE

On the air, keep an ear open for members of the FG4KI Radio
Club who are currently operating special event station TO4R
from Guadeloupe.  This in celebration of the  10th Sailing
Transatlantic Race which takes place between Saint Malo,
France, and Pointe a Pitre, Guadeloupe.  Stations are
operational on 160 through 6 meters using CW, SSB, RTTY and
a number of digital modes.  The station will shut down on
November 16th.  QSL via F4AVX.  (OPDX)

**

DX

In DX, DL6KVA will be active as 4K0CW from Azerbaijan
between November 26th and December 2nd.  Operations will be
CW only on all HF bands using 100 watts into a long wire.
He  also plans to participate in the CQ World Wide DX CW
Contest on November 29th and 30th.  QSL via DL6KVA via the
bureau or electronically using Logbook of the World.

DL7DF will be on holiday in Senegal through November 13th
operating slash 6W. Operations are 160 through 10 meters
using CW, SBB, RTTY, PSK31 and SSTV. QSL via DL7DF, direct
or by the DARC Bureau.

RV3MA will be operational from Morocco as CN2MA until
December 1st.  QSL both callsigns via UA2FM.

JA0JHQ will be active stroke FK from New Calidonia between
November 21st through the 24th.  Operations will be limited
to the High Frequency bands using CW and SSB. QSL via his
home callsign.

Lastly, UT5UGR will be active as FM stroke KL7WA from
Martinique between November 24th and December 1st.  Activity
will likely be on all HF bands except 30, 17 and 12 meters and 
Digital modes.  Also look for him to be active during the CQ
World Wide DX CW Contest signing as TO7A QSL both callsigns
via UT5UGR.

This weeks DX news courtesy of the Ohio=Penn DX Newsletter

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  BBC UNVEILS ITS GENOME PROJECT

And finally this week, the British Broadcasting Corporation
has announced the launch of what it calls the BBC Genome.
This is a comprehensive project that's aimed at publishing a
comprehensive history of every radio and TV program ever
broadcast by the Corporation.

Launched in beta test format, the BBC Genome lets viewers
and listeners search millions of programs, cast details,
writers and transmission dates of past BBC shows as listed
in 4469 editions of Radio Times. The project scanned 350,622
pages and 4,423,653 program records from Radio Times between
1923 and 2009.

The next phase of the project will look at capturing
regional and national variations and changes to the planned
broadcast schedules.  More is on the web at tinyurl.com/BBC-
genome

(BBC)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, CQ Magazine, the
FCC, the Ohio Penn DX Bulletin, Rain, the RSGB, the South
African Radio League, the Southgate News, TwiT-TV,
Australia's WIA News and you our listeners, that's all from
the Amateur Radio Newsline.  Our e-mail address is newsline
(at) arnewsline (dot) org. More information is available at
Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or support us
at Amateur Radio NewslineT, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa
Clarita California, 91350.

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Skeeter Nash, N5ASH, saying 73 and we thank you for
listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline™ is Copyright 2014.  All rights
reserved.

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