Amateur Radio Newsline™ Report 1944 - November 14 2014

13:07 Fernando Luiz de Souza 0 Comments







Podcast


Amateur Radio Newsline™ report number 1944 with a release
date of November 14th 2014 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST.  The FCC revokes the amateur license
of a convicted sex offender; the ARRL asks the FCC to
continue issuing paper amateur license documents; permanent
access to 60 meters moves a bit closer for hams in
Argentina; the 4M Lunar fly-by transponder goes Q-R-T; more
non-ham intruders hit the amateur radio bands and the
capturing first light gives a look back in time.  All this
and more on Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1944 coming
your way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)


**

RADIO LAW:  FCC REVOKES LICENSE OF CONVICTED SEX OFFENDER

The FCC has reversed an earlier decision made by one of its
Administrative Law judges and revoked the Amateur Service
license of a Seattle Washington resident who had been
convicted of at least one felony sex offense involving a
minor.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Don Wilbanks, AE5DW, has
the details:

--

According to the FCC, back in 2007 its Enforcement Bureau
received information that David Titus, KB7ILD, had been
convicted as an adult of the Class 3 sex related felony and
served 25 months in prison.  The bureau issued an Order to
Show Cause why his license should not be revoked when the
agency learned Titus may have been convicted of earlier
felonies for sex related crimes while a juvinile.

In his initial decision made in 2010, Administrative Law
Judge Richard Sippel concluded the bureau had not met the
burden of proof to determine that Titus lacked the
qualifications to be a commission licensee.  Though he found
Titus had committed at least four sexual offenses against
children, he stated that only the adult conviction should be
considered because the other offenses took place when Titus
was himself a minor.  He also noted that this had been more
than a decade before the then ongoing FCC show-cause
proceeding.

The adult offense occurred when Titus was 18.  Judge Sippel
found what he apparently believed to be credible evidence
Titus had been rehabilitated between then and 2007.  That
was backed up by testimony from a psychologist and several
other character witnesses.  Also noted at the time was that
Titus had expressed his personal remorse.

The Enforcement Bureau appealed Judge Sippel's decision to
the full commission.  The bureau argued judge Sippel failed
to take into account the number and the egregious nature of
the Titus offenses and that the passage of time should not
have mattered in adjudicating this case.  The bureau also
asserted that the judge ignored the danger to children when
a sex offender has access to amateur radio.

In rendering its November 5th decision, the commission
agreed with the Enforcement Bureau and found that Judge
Sippel should have considered Titus' juvenile convictions.
Also that that Judge Sippel should have given more weight to
the Washington State Police advisory that Titus remained a
high-risk sex offender.

The Commission then found Titus unqualified to hold an
amateur license and ordered that it be revoked.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks, AE5DW, in
New Orleans.

--

In rendering its decision the Commission stated that it
would be remiss in its responsibilities as a licensing
authority if it continues to authorize David Titus to hold
an amateur radio license that could be used to put him in
contact with children.  At this point it would appear as if
Titus only option to try to regain his amateur service
license would be to take any further appeals into the
Federal Court system.  The complete 10 page decision can be
rad on-line at tinyurl.com/titus-license-revoked.  (FCC, RW,
other published reports)

**

RADIO LAW:  ARRL ASKS FCC TO KEEP ISSUING PAPER LICENSES FOR
RADIO AMATEURS

The ARRL is giving partial thumbs down to virtual licenses
for radio amateurs.  This in comments filed November 5th,
where the League has recommended the FCC continue to provide
paper license documents to amateur radio licensees who want
them.

According to the ARRL Letter, the League's comments were in
response to an FCC Public Notice in WT Docket 14-161.
Among other issues it proposes the regulatory agency wants
to cease the routine issuance of hard-copy license documents
to all Wireless Service licensees but will permit the agency
to continue the issuance of paper documents during the
transition period to specific classes of licensees that
specifically request them.

Under the FCC proposal once a license application is
granted, the Universal Licensing System will generate an
official electronic license but will no longer mail a paper
copy license unless notified that the licensee wishes to
receive such a document.  Until new procedures are
finalized, however, the Commission will continue to print
and mail paper licenses, unless notified to stop.

The FCC claims that the proposed elimination of most paper
documents is an action being taken under the Report on FCC
Reform issued earlier this year.  It says that to the extent
permitted by Federal records retention requirements that
licensing bureaus should eliminate paper copies of licenses.

You can read the entire twelve pages detailing proposed
changes on the FCC website at tinyurl.com/no-more-paper-
license.  The ARRL's comments are at tinyurl.com/arrl-paper-
license-response.  (ARRL)

**

RESTRUCTURING:  FULL 60 METER ACCESS MOVES CLOSER IN
ARGENTINA BUT NOT YET

The IARU member society the Radio Club Argentino has gained
support for future access to the 60 meter or 5 MHz band.
This, ahead of the issue being decided in November 2015 by
the next World Radiocommunications Conference.  Amateur
Radio Newsline's Stephan Kinford, N8WB, has more:

--

In its November 10th newsletter the Radio Club Argentino
said that the release of the 60 meter band in Argentina
could happen sooner than most thought.  This after it raised
the issue to the nation's telecommunications authorities.

The meeting had included an in depth discussion on the
matter.  At that gathering, the Argentine Ministry of
Communications delegation supported the allocation of a
continuous 60 meter band segment of 5.275 to 5.450 MHz for
amateur radio on a secondary basis.  It also had agreed to
bring the matter up at a meeting of the Inter-American
Telecommunications Commission known as CITEL meeting held
recently in Mexico.  The initiative won sufficient support
from CITEL delegates to be adopted as the regional position.

The 60 meter band was first introduced in 2002.  Ever since
that time various nations have released it temporarily to
their radio amateurs as various spot frequencies or with a
wider multi-channeled allocation.   Making it a world-wide
ham radio secondary allocation will be discussed at the next
World Radiocommunications gathering to be held in Geneva,
Switzerland, next year.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kindord, N8WB,
reporting.

--

The International Amateur Radio Union supports a 60 meter
world-wide allocation because it sits between the 80  and 40
meter bands.  This provides useful propagation for local to
medium distances, often needed for disaster communication
training and actual emergency response events.  (VK3PC)

**

INTRUDER WATCH:  LATEST IARUMS REPORT ON HF RADIO INTRUDERS

The International Amateur Radio Union Monitoring
System reports on interference caused by Russian taxis
operating in the 10 meter amateur radio band.  The report
says that the taxi cabs were monitored flooding all of 10
meter FM on a daily basis and that so far nobody seems to be
able to stop the taxi intrusions.  The report noted that the
MUF or maximum usable frequency has been rather high, and
the F2 layers were strong and stable.

The Monitoring Service also reports on some strong
disturbances that were caused by an Over the Horizon system
in China in the evening hours of evening hours October 26th
and 27th covering 80 percent of the 40 meter band.  It also
says that Spanish fishermen were heard daily on 3.500,
3.510, 3.520 MHz and several other frequencies using upper
sideband every morning and evening.  The report notes that
many Far East intruders were also found on 10 meter FM in
the mornings.  (IARUMS)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  4M LUNAR FLY-BY PACKAGE FALLS SILENT

The Lux Space 4 M moon circling ham radio mission carrying
an amateur radio JT65B payload has fallen silent.  This
after transmitting continiously for 438 hours which was well
past the predicted 100 hour limit.

The Southgate News reports that during the afternoon of
November 10th the battery voltage dropped from 13.1V to
12.1V and continued falling.  The last signal was received
by Rein Smit, W6SZ, in Alta Loma, California at 01:35 UTC on
November 11th when the battery voltage had fallen to 8.4
volts.

4 M stands for the Manfred Memorial Moon Mission.  Carried
to the Moon on a Chinese Long March booster, it successfully
completed its loop around the moon on October 28th.  It then
returned to Earth and went into a high elliptical orbit
around our home planet where it remains today.  (Southgate)

**

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station.  We are the Amateur
Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world
including the N2VRO repeater serving Hudson Valley New York.

(5 sec pause here)


**

WORLDBEAT:  RSGB ANNOUNCES 10,000 USERS FOR DMR

Digital Mobile Radio better known by the acronym DMR appears
to be coming of age in ham radio.  Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
has more:

--

The Radio Society of Great Britain reports that on October
29th the world-wide Digital Mobile Radio system added its
10,000th ham radio user ID.  According to the society, there
are now over 800 Digital Mobile Radio repeaters in 33
countries, allowing amateurs using DMR radios to talk to
each other globally using the internet.

DMR was not developed specifically for ham radio.  Rather
the standard is a VHF and UHF digital voice method that was
published by the European Telecommunications Standards
Institute in 2005 with the goal of providing digital
communication systems that are low cost, of low complexity
and interoperable between equipment vendors.  The system
uses a 12.5 KHz or narrower channel bandwidth, 4 FSK digital
modulation and the ability to be used anywhere between 30
MHz and 1 Gigahertz.  As such products built specifically to
the DMR standard also complies with the FCC mandates for
narrowband systems here in the United States.

For yet unexplained reasons, DMR has begun creating its own
following within the ham radio community as an alternative
to other digital voice modes.  How far DMR will grow within
the world of amateur radio digital audio as compared to the
various systems designed specifically for use by radio
amateurs is impossible to predict, but 10,000 is a pretty
good start.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF,
in Los Angeles.

--

You can find further information about DMR and its adoption
in amateur radio circles at www.va3xpr.net.  (GB2RS, RSGB)

**

EMCOMM:  FCC EYES NEW RULES TO PROTECT CONSUMERS AS VOICE
NETWORKS TRANSITION TO IP

The Federal Communications Commission will likely consider
new rules to ensure consumer choice and safety as the nation
shifts from copper-based networks to Voice over Internet
Protocol or VoIP transmission.  This, when it meets on
November 21st.

In making the announcement agency officials said that
Chairman Thomas Wheeler will offer a set of proposals during
the meeting designed to protect voice customers.  This will
likely include network-sharing rules and possibly requiring
power backup systems on VoIP networks. Traditional copper
wire based telephone networks supply power to connected
telephones, but phones connected to fiber based networks
require their own power source.

During natural disasters and other emergencies utility
supplied power can be disabled.  The FCC believes it to be
important for VoIP customers to be able to make phone calls,
FCC officials said.
(Published reports)

**

ENFORCEMENT:  FCC OPENS INQUIRY INTO FALSE EAS ALERT

A follow-up to our story two weeks regarding the October
24th false emergency alert that hit AT&T U-verse customers
in parts of Georgia, Texas, Tennessee, Michigan and
Mississippi.  Late word is that the FCC's Public Safety and
Homeland Security Bureau has opened a full scale inquiry as
to how it happened and to prevent it from happening again.

Soon after the incident FEMA spokesperson Rafael Lemaitre
stated that there had been an inappropriate playing of the
national emergency alert notification tones on a syndicated
radio broadcast.  It was later revealed the unauthorized
activation originated during a broadcast of the Bobby Bones
Show out of Nashville. Tennessee.

While stations that aired the alert may yet face Enforcement
Bureau action or fines, the real concern is that the
incident revealed potential flaws in how Emergency Alert
System is set up.  So the just-launched inquiry will focus
on ways to improve the system to prevent a similar problem
in the future.  Among the issues being looked at are how
stations authenticate an alert message and what sort of
actions local police agencies take when faced with a flood
of public confusion after an authorized alert is sent.

At the same time, the Public Safety and Homeland Security
Bureau is urging stations to immediately check their
equipment to make sure the fake alert isn't still armed and
ready to broadcast.  This is a possibility that equipment
manufacturers have told the FCC is possible.
(Inside Radio)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  LOTW ERROR HANDELING CQ WPX SUBMISSIONS

According to the ARRL, its been determined that some
CQ WPX Awards Program applications using the League's
Logbook of The World were not properly processed.
Specifically, applications for WPX credits submitted via
Logbook of The World from October 8th at 0500 UTC until
November 5th at 1700 UTC were never processed but these
applicants credit cards were not charged.  Applicants
should now re-submit any application for WPX credits made
during this period.  (ARRL)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  MONTANA RADIO CLUB PRAISED BY MEDIA OUTLET

Members of the Yellowstone Amateur Radio Emergency Services
received some words of commendation from a local media
outlet in their home base of Billings, Montana.  According
to a report on the KPAX.com website, the ham radio group has
helped with many cicic activities including the Peaks to
Prairie Adventure Race, the Big Sky State Games and the
Montana Marathon.

But a lot of the praise is toward the clubs efforts in
helping to train those interested in entering the hobby and
preparing them for the required FCC test.  It noted that the
club sponsors training classes every other month.

The report cites the clubs disadter preparedness.  Ron
Glass, WN7Y who serves as the emergency coordinator for the
Yellowstone group notes that hams are on call with the
county and the city and the state to provide back-up
communications if they need to anytime the communications is
threatened or overloaded.

Yellowstone Amateur Radio Emergency Services is an
ARES program sponsored by the Yellowstone Radio Club.  The
complete story about its work is on the web is at
tinyurl.com/yellowstone-radio-club.  The sponsoring clubs
own website can be found at www.k7efa.net     (eHam.net and
other published news reports)

**

HAM HAPPENINGS:  COMMEMORATING B36 CREW LOSS

The Sun City Amateur Radio Club of El Paso Texas will be
operating a special event station K5WPH on December 13th and
14th from 1600 to 0100 UTC.  This to commemorate the crew of
a B-36-D bomber that crashed in the near-by Franklin
Mountains on December 11th 1953.  If you make contact,
please QSL with a self addressed dtamped envelope to the Sun
City Amateur Radio Club, B-36 Special Event, 3709 Wickham,
El Paso, Texas, 79904.  (KD6CUB)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS: K6LCS FUNDRAISING FOR AMSAT-NA WITH A
DIFFERENCE

Some names in the news.  Clint Bradford, K6LCS, is making
donating to AMSAT-North America's Fox satellite project a
bit more interesting.  This as he announces that he is
cleaning out his closet of some space-related memorabilia
and offering it as incentives to donate.

Among the first items that Bradford has donated are a United
States Postal Service commemorative first-day cover
celebrating the Soyuz/Apollo mission.  Also posted is a 24-
stamp plate block, and an Apollo 11 Tenth Year first-day
cover.

According to Bradford, this is a way for satellite
supporters to acquire a piece of history and at the same
time support future satellite projects.  More information on
the web at tinyurl.com/fox-fundraising.  (Southgate, K6LCS)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  VE3AJB ACCEPTS SEVEL ACTING POSITIONS IN
RAC ONTARIO SECTION

Radio Amateurs of Canada has announced that Allan Boyd,
VE3AJB has accepted the position of Assistant Section
Manager for Ontario North Section.  He will also continue in
his role as Chair of the Ontario Section Managers Council
and will also undertake two other positions related to the
Ontario Section.  Boyd was the Ontario Section Manager
before the creation of new sections in Ontario.  (RAC,
VE4BAW)

**

NAMES IN THE NEWS:  M0PHI NEW CHAIR OF RSGB TRAINING AND
EDUCATION COMMITTEE

The Radio Society of Great Britain has announced the
appointment of Philip Willis, M0PHI as the new Chairman of
its Training and Education Committee  Willis succeeds Steve
Hartley, G0FUW, in this position.  (GB2RS)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur.  We are
the Amateur Radio Newsline with links to the world from our
only official website at www.arnewsline.org and being
relayed by the volunteer services of the following radio
amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE:  ISS EXPEDIITION 41 COMES HOME

After nearly six months on the International Space Station,
three crew members of Expedition 41 are are back on solid
ground.  Flight Engineers Alexander Gerst, KF5ONO, of
Germany, Reid Wiseman, KF5LKT, of the United States and
Commander Max Suraev landed safely in Kazakhstan on Sunday
night November 9th after a three and a half hour descent
from the orbiting outpost in a Soyuz vehicle.

While on-orbit, Gerst signing OR4ISS made contact with
several Earth bound stations including one with the
Explorers Club on October 25th.  During that exchange he got
to speak to Apollo 16 Astronaut Charlie Duke who asked Gerst
what was the most interesting in flight experiment he was
working on.  Gerst had a hard time in declaring any one in
particular.

Their replacements, who will launch to the ISS on November
24th are Expedition 42 crew members Terry Virts, Anton
Shkaplerov and Samantha Cristoforetti, IZ0UDF.  Russian
cosmonauts Elena Serova, Alexander Samoukutyaev and U-S
astronaut Barry Wilmore are already on the ISS and have
already activated the Expedition 42 operations.

As an aside, only a few weeks ago the International Space
Station marked the 14th anniversary of the arrival of its
first crew. The station has been manned continuously since
November 2, 2000.  (various news sources)

**

WORLDBEAT:  LISTEN OUT FOR 91 NEW SOUTH AFRICA HAMS

There should be upward of ninety-one new South African
amateurs on the air soon.  The South African Radio League
reports that one hundred candidates recently took their ham
radio exam and of these ninety-one passed the test.  Thanks
to an agreement with the nation's telecommunications
regulator and the South African Radio League those who
passed the exam should be on the air as soon as their call
signs get posted to the South African Radio League list of
successful candidate's web page.  (SARL)

**

ON THE AIR:  SPECIAL-EVENT STATION FOR 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF
OSCAR 7 LAUNCH

On the air, Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK, has secured the
special call sign W7O.  This for use in commemorating the
40th anniversary of the launch of AMSAT-OSCAR 7 that took
place on November 15th 1974 from Vandenberg Air Force Base
on California's southern coastline.

Stoddard plans on having the W7O call for 10 days between
November 15th through the 24th working many of the ham radio
satellites as he can and possibly other terrestrial ham
radio bands as well.   Stoddard says that he will work as
many birds as he can from his location in Arizona, including
passes of the now four decade old AMSAT OSCAR 7.  He may
also recruit some operators to work High Frequency bands
using the W7O commemorative call.  WD9EWK will handle the
QSL requests for the W7O call during this period.

If you want to volunteer or have any questions related to
this operation please contact Stoddard direct by e-mail to
patrick at wd9ewk dot net.  But adds Stoddard the W7Ohcall
can only be operated from US territory, where amateur radio
is regulated by the FCC.  It cannot be used from outside US
territory, as 1 by1 special calls are not covered by any of
agreements between the USA and other countries.   (ANS)

**

ON THE AIR:  TURKEYS TO BE ACTIVATED FOR THANKSGIVING

In celebration of Thanksgiving, Terry Joyner, W4YBV, plans
to be on the air November 22nd and 23rd.  This to activate
two islands on the Suwannee River in Levy County, Florida
for the United States Islands Award Program.

Adptly enough these land masses are called Turkey Island and
Little Turkey Island.  Look for Terry on 40 through 10
meters from 1300 and 2200 hours each day.  More information
including QSL routing is available at W4YBV on QRZ.com.
(OPDX)

**

ON THE AIR:  CO0SS CELEBRATING FOUNDING OF TWO CUBAN CITIES

And be on the lookout for Cuban special event station C-Oh-
zero-S-S between November 21st and the 23rd.  This, to
celebrate the 500th anniversary of the two heritage cities
founded in 1514 in south-central Cuba.  Operations will be
on 40 through 10 meters using CW, SSB, PSK, SSTV and RTTY.
QSL via EA5GL.  (OPDX)

**

DX

In DX, DC0KK will active as 4S7KKG from Sri Lanka through
April 10th, 2015.  He operates mainly using CW and the
digital modes.  QSL via his home preferably via the bureau.
Direct cards go to the information listed on QRZ.com.

EA7FTR is active as D44KS from Cape Verde through December
5th.  Operations are limited to his spare time due to work
commitments but you can listen out for hin on 40 through 6
meters using SSB and RTTY.  QSL via EB7DX.

OZ1DJJ will be operational as OX3LX from Disko Island
between November 26th and December 2nd.  Activity will be on
the High Frequency bands. QSL via OZ1PIF direct.

PA0VDV will be on the air from stroke PJ2 from Curacao
between November 20th and December 26th.  Activity will be
on 80 through 10 meters using only CW only. QSL to his home
callsign direct or via the bureau.

VE6LB will be active as stroke A6 from Dubai in the United
Arab Emirates between December 2nd and the 25th.  This will
be a holiday style operation on 40 through 10 meters but
with a focus on the 12 and 10 meter bands.  Paper QSL
requests go direct via his home callsign.  Electronic QSL's
can use either Logbook of the World or eQSL

Lastly, DF3FS and DL9OLI will be operating stroke 5Z4 from
Diani Beach, Kenya, between February 16th and March 8th of
2015.  Activity will be holiday style on 80 through 10
meters using CW and SSB.  QSL via their home callsigns,
either direct or the via the bureau.

**

THAT FINAL ITEM:  MEASURING POLORIZATION OF COSMIC
BACKGROUND RADIATION

And finally the POLARBEAR Consortium headed by researchers
at University of California at Berkeley has reported a major
breakthrough in measurement of polarization of cosmic
microwave background radiation.  This by capturing some of
the oldest light in the universe and using newly developed
instrumentation to assess it.  Amateur Radio Newsline's Jim
Davis, W2JKD, reports:

--

POLARBEAR measures remnant radiation from the Big Bang,
which has cooled and stretched with the expansion of the
universe to microwave lengths.  This cosmic microwave
background or CMB acts as an enormous backlight illuminating
the large-scale structure of the universe and carrying an
imprint of cosmic history.

To capture this energy the research team says that it
developed sensitive instruments called as bolometers to
analyze this early light.  The bolometers record the
direction of light's electric field from multiple points.
The team says that it has mapped these angles with
resolution on a scale of about 3 arc-minutes which equates
to one-tenth of the diameter of the full Moon.

The POLARBEAR consortium's Cosmic Microwave Background
polarization experiment being conducted by more than 70
researchers from numerous universities.  The team's overall
mission is to gain an in-depth knowledge of the universe and
its origin since the cosmic microwave background carries an
imprint of the cosmic history.

The research team has provided more information in the paper
published in the Astrophysical Journal.  More is on-line at
tinyurl.com/space-of-the-past

I'm Jim Davis, W2JKD.

--

In all a very fascinating look back at the history of the
universe from the dawning of time.  (Phys.org, Uncover
California)

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, CQ Magazine, the
FCC, the Ohio Penn DX Bulletin, Rain, the RSGB, the South
African Radio League, the Southgate News, TwiT-TV,
Australia's WIA News and you our listeners, that's all from
the Amateur Radio Newsline.  Our e-mail address is newsline
(at) arnewsline (dot) org. More information is available at
Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or support us
at Amateur Radio Newsline, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa Clarita
California, 91350.

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors' desk,
I'm Hal Rogers, K8CMD, saying 73 and we thank you for
listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline™ is Copyright 2014.  All rights
reserved.

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